12 half-marathons in 12 months…

So, shortly after running a half marathon in June, the lovely bride came up with an idea.  Why don’t we run a half marathon a month for 12 months.  This would keep our training level pretty constant year round, and would make for a pretty fun achievement.  And, so, starting in September we ran the Applecrest Half in Hampton Falls, NH.  Then there was the Smuttynose Half in Hampton Beach, NH in October.  And, today it was the Shelburne Half in Vermont.  Next month, there is another half in Atkinson, NH, and it will get interesting to see how training goes as the snow, and the temperatures, begin to fall.

Not that running in the Winter months is new for us.  We trained for marathons through the Winters in Chicago–and 20 or so miles on the lakefront in Chicago with the wind blowing definitely added to the challenge.

That said, after the half marathon today, following some much needed strong coffee, we got showered and headed of on a little antiquing/cameling adventure.

Cameling? You ask…

Well, when we had driven to the place were are staying, I looked over at a nearby pasture and amongst many sheep, was a camel.

A Camel?

We had to go back and hunt the camel down.

camelinvt

 

Indeed, there it was.

After stopping off to see “Humpy,” not that we learned the camel’s actual name, we just felt it appropriate, we headed off to do a little antiquing.  And, we did manage to pick up a German corkscrew with spring.  Nothing to write home about, but still a nice little find amongst some other additions to the house.

Tomorrow, we hit the road early, and will head back to Maine, back to Rockand, and then hop on the boat towards home.

If any corkscrews (or camels) are found, I will report back here.

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2 responses

  1. Trust Josef to find the rarer variant viz.
    The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large, even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of Central Asia. Of the two species of camel, it is by far the rarer.[2] The Bactrian camel has two humps on its back, in contrast to the single-humped dromedary camel.[3] Its population of two million exists mainly in the domesticated form.[4] Some authorities, notably the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), use the binomial name Camelus ferus for the wild Bactrian camel and reserve Camelus bactrianus for the domesticated Bactrian came

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