“All who have had the occasion to use a corkscrew, and who hasn’t ?…”

Speaking of the Maud’s that might make the best six for 2014. Here is what an 1895 issue of House Furnishing Review had to say about it:

“The “Turncork” Corkscrew is one of the latest things sent over from London, and it should provide a positive blessing to a Kentucky man. All who have had the occasion to use a corkscrew, and who hasn’t ? will appreciate that it is the first pull which generally breaks the back and strains the wrists of the operator. The “Turncork” puts an end to all this pulling and tugging, as the action of the new corkscrew just twists the cork easily from its bed with a gradual motion, and without any unnecessary exertion, or risk of breaking the bottle. The principle is as follows: In an ordinary corkscrew, immediately above the top of the worm, is fixed an attachment consisting of a revolving disc, or washer, having on its underside three short steel pints These are forced into the top of the cork as the screw passes through. Underneath this upper and larger disc is a smaller one that does not revolve, but which has upon its upper surface small cogs or projections, corresponding with the like ones on the underside of the revolving disc. Immediately the cork touches the lower washer, it is forced upwards, and catches on the projections on the upper disc, thus locking the two securely together upon the shank of the corkscrew, so that if the person using it continues to turn the corkscrew in the same direction, the cork itself is forced round, and can gradually, and with the greatest care, drawn from the neck of the bottle. As the whole action is purely automatic, locking and unlocking by merely twisting the screw in the ordinary way, this new corkscrew cannot possibly get out of order, and is always ready for use.

And, in and issue of Chemist and Druggist (also from 1895).

MESSRS. Fordham & Sons (Limited) are introducing a new corkscrew, invented by Mr. Maud (a chemist, we believe), which they have called the “Turncork.” Its construction is shown in the engraving.

maudillustrated

To an ordinary corkscrews, and above the top of the worm, there is fixed an attachment consisting of a revolving disc or washer, having on its under-side three short steel pins, which are forced into the top of the cork as the screw passes through. Within this is a smaller disc which does not revolve, but which has upon its upper surface small cogs, or projections, corresponding with like ones on the under side of the revolving disc. Immediately the cork touches this lower washer it is faced upward, and catches upon the projections on the upper disc, thus locking the two securely together upon the shank of the corkscrew; so that if the person using it continues to turn the corkscrew in the same direction, the cork itself is forced round, and can gradually, and with the greatest ease, drawn from the neck of the bottle.

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