In the house, at picnics, with garden parties, in the forest, on the road, or as an adjunct to the little tête-à-tête in the arbor where a can of salmon, sardines, or other relish, with an acceptable bottle, may be deemed “the proper thing…”

From an 1892 issue of The American Stationer comes an advertisement for a combination can opener and corkscrew.

Combination Can Opener and Corkscrew

A nickel plate or oxidized combination corkscrew and can opener is the latest idea of that irrepressible novelty gatherer, the Magic Introduction Company. The cut herewith given shows the screw open for use, but this of course closes and neatly hides itself in a groove made for it. The article will strike anyone as having the “novelty of usefulness” in it to a very high degree.

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In the house, at picnics, with garden parties, in the forest, on the road, or as an adjunct to the little tête-à-tête in the arbor where a can of salmon, sardines, or other relish, with an acceptable bottle, may be deemed “the proper thing,” this new idea of the Magic Introduction Company will be appreciated. Moreover, it looks well and is cheap.

And, if you possibly needed more enticement, a second ad appears.

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“Every person who uses canned or bottled goods needs a Combination Can Opener and Corkscrew. Housekeepers, husbands, wives, cooks, waiters and butlers, men and women who live in furnished rooms, tourists and commercial travelers will buy one some day. It is made of the best material, nicely polished and finished in two styles—Nickel Plated and Oxidized—either of which does not look out of place on the finest sideboard. Has no equal as a can opener, will pull any cork and may be used for cutting wires from necks of bottles.

Who ever before heard of an oxidized can opener ? These can openers compare favorably in appearance with oxidized silver jewelry and toilet articles.

Sample by Mail, 15c.
One Dozen by Mail, $1.40.

Dealers everywhere should send for our Illustrated Catalogue, or, when in the city, call and eqamine [sic] our good sellers.

Magic Introduction Co.,

321 BROADWAY,
NEW YORK

Looks strikingly similar to the PAT APL’D FOR, can opener which we later came to discover was the 1873 Daniel Barnes patent.

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I. Best

Not too long ago, I mentioned winning three corkscrews in an auction on eBay, and that lot itself went fairly low. And, within the lot, was an 18 century double folding corkscrew with pipe tampers.

This, in itself, made the lot quite the steal.

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The three corkscrews arrived today, and as it turns out, the double folder is signed.

I. BEST

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This would be the first signed example of the 18c. double folding corkscrew that I have ever owned. And, it certainly made my afternoon (btw, it is snowing AGAIN!).

As soon as I saw the signature on the piece, I knew exactly where to look for further information on the piece. Of course, I would look at Bert Giulian’s text on 18th century corkscrews, but also I headed to Webby’s website, as he and Brian May have published several articles, and one on the I. BEST signed pieces. You can link to that article here.

Thanks for the information Webby!!!

A neat, and rather rare, signed corkscrew.