“simple and powerful implement for extracting corks…”

From the September 4th, 1869 issue of Scientific American

Improved Cork Extractor.

Our engraving shows a simple and powerful implement for extracting corks from bottles, patented Jan. 14, 1868, by James Morton, of Philadelphia. It consists of three bars pivoted together, which, together with the corkscrew, constitute the entire apparatus. One of the bars has a socket or cap at its lower end, which is placed on and around the neck of the bottle. Near the upper end of this first post or bar is pivoted the end of the second bar, near the middle of which the third bar is pivoted. The second and third bars have handles at their outer ends, and at the inner end of their third bar is a hook.

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This hook engages with the corkscrew in the manner delineated in the engraving, and by forcing the handles together or pressing them downward, the cork can be easily extracted. The instrument is equally adapted to extracting corks on which rings or hooks are already formed so that no corkscrew is needed.

For further particulars address James Morton, 912 South Eighth street, Philadelphia, Pa

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a few arrivals, and looking ahead…

Over the last few days, there have been a few corkscrew arrivals in the post office box.  And, while I was quite pleased to have the Gold Knight and Olympic opener show up, much of our time these days are focused on our upcoming ICCA and CCCC meetings, and we are excited to host all of you.

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Both the Gold Knight and the Olympic opener didn’t disappoint.   In fact, both are in better condition than expected.  The Opener with corkscrew will find its way into the collection, and the Knight will be put up as trade bait, as it is indeed a double, or if you are keeping track of previous knights, and octuple; as this is the eighth one that I have found.

As far as the meetings, we are putting finalized details on reservations, looking at side trips, and finalizing menus and wine lists.  We are looking forward to sharing our little part of the world with all of the attendees, and are really excited to host all of you at our home on the island.

$87.99 buy it now, or best offer

Everyone likes a deal.

And, there are times when sellers of antique corkscrews put a price on a corkscrew without knowing the real value of the corkscrew that they are selling.  And, there are other times when those putting antique corkscrews up for sale, do a bit of research, to find out what the current market value is.

The other day it was the former, rather than the latter.

I was in between writing beer and wine orders, and decided to take a glance at eBay.

And, what was the first listing that came up but a Syroco Knight with a buy it now with a best offer option.

The buy it now price was an unbelievable deal at $87.99; but it had a best offer option…

Best offer?

Should I???

I fought every fiber of my being to try to get it for less, and clicked the buy it now button.

Promptly paying, the deal was done.

The goods are attractive in appearance and are made as either right or left hand, as desired.

August 20, 1898 issue of Metal Worker:

POCKET CORK SCREW No. 21

Erie Specialty Company, Erie, Pa., are putting on the market the pocket cork screw herewith shown. The points of excellence enumerated by the manufacturers include the following: That the screws are made of steel and finely tempered, highly polished and nickeled: that they will draw any cork, and that they are strong and durable. In Fig. 2 the cork screw is shown in the shape for carrying in the pocket, being compact and taking but little room. The goods are attractive in appearance and are made as either right or left hand, as desired.

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As we know, this is Walker’s 1898 patent (# 611,046) for his peg and worm.

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Although the patent drawing is more reflective of the advertising version that sometimes turns up.

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Interestingly, of the two Walker peg and worms in our collection, one is right hand and one is left hand…