Turquoise, Arrowhead, Beads….

Okay… I am pretty sure the decorations are aftermarket, but yesterday a snuff box with foldout corkscrew came up on eBay with a smokin’ buy it now price.

The corkscrew, knife, and snuff box seemed to be in nice shape, but somewhere along the line, some one decided to add some turquoise pieces, what looks to be an arrowhead, and surrounded the arrowhead with red beads…

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Embellishments aside, it is a cool corkscrew.  And, as mentioned, it was cheap.

After making sure the corkscrew was all there, I snapped it up.

When it arrives, I will provide better pictures…  Perhaps this should end up in a collection located in the South West…  Any takers?  Feel free to send trade offers : )

Lifting shallow mustard bottle corks…

From a 1908 issue of Home Furnishing Review

The “Best” Can Opener and Cap Remover

This Tool is a most complete kitchen necessity, is made of steel, and is highly finished. The blades are of crucible tool steel, carefully tempered and the instrument

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includes five tools in one. It is a can opener and cork puller, and has in addition a fixed tongue, which is exceedingly handy in removing crown caps, lifting mil bottle seals without spilling milk, and extracting small, flat corks from condiment bottles in the manner shown in the illustration. It is a very handy tool and one that will fine almost every day use in the household. This is one of the many specialties made by the W. G. Browne Manufacturing Company, Kingston New York

When the Bird patent turns up, it is marked “PATS 3-28-07 & PENDING.”  and “THE BEST / CAN OPENER / CAP REMOVER / BOTTLE OPENER”

Of course, this particular can opener from W.G. Browne, is the 1909 Benjamin J. Bird patent # 913,191.  The ’07 patent refers to Bird’s previous patent # 854,979 (Thanks Mark Woodard for the information!).

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I am on currently hunting the Bird, if you happen to have one!

Interesting to note that one of the Bird’s appendages was intended to open condiment bottle corks!!

Frary Arrival

As mentioned recently, I picked up an oblong handle Frary corkscrew with the Henshall-type button.  This one has a little plus sign underneath that serves as a cork grabber.

And, given I have several of these in different sizes, with different worms, I had hoped that it would be a variant.

It arrived the other day, and the size of the handle, shank, and button, pretty much look the same; not that I pulled out my micrometer to check the exact measurements.

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Okay, I haven’t used a micrometer since my days as a machinist, but…

..they look to be the same, until you compare the worms.

Both are complete length, with no breakage or damage to either, but clearly one is longer than the other.

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So, technically not a new variation for the collection, but pretty cool nonetheless.

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If you have a Frary corkscrew with which you would like to part,

feel free to drop me a line.  I will happily add it to the collection!

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On another note, the lovely personal personal trainer and I are off on a road-tripping adventure for a few days.  If any corkscrews are discovered, I will provide updates here!

Stay Tuned!