Smith’s Patent Palace Cork Extractor

From an 1890 issue of Iron Age:

Smith’s Patent Palace Cork Extractor

The Chicago Nickel Works, 95 Ohio street, Chicago, Ill., are putting on the market the above-named article, which is represented in the accompanying illustrations in position for use.  It will be perceived that this extractor is different in appearance from others on the market.  The simplicity of its construction and the ease with which it may be operated are referred to by the makers.  In use the neck of the bottle is pressed into the mouth of the device and in line with it.  The lever shown is then pulled sharply forward, which motion rotates the screw into the cork.  Pushing the lever back to its former position draws the cork and reverses the screw.  At the same time the cork is thrown off and the machine is again ready for use.  The appliance is described as made of gun metal with ebony or mahogany and finely finished in nickel.  The screw works on ball-bearings, and the point is made that it has no cogs, racks or springs to get out of order.  The extractor is made with clamp, as shown herewith, or with base to screw on, as may be preferred, and can quickly be attached to or detached from a counter or sideboard.  All parts are interchangeable, and it is state that any person with but little

Smith’s Patent Palace Cork Extractor

mechanical ability can insert any broken part, though the machine is not liable to get out of order.  The elegance of the finish of the machine and its durability and satisfactory working are points referred to by the manufacturers.