General Appliance Co.

Several years ago, I was sent a collection of past best sixes.  Not the actual corkscrews, but binders of photos and printouts of various collectors best six corkscrews from years prior.

Interestingly, some of these best sixes consisted of a single photograph, some would be a typed up report with several photos, and still others would be a little more elaborate.  As I paged through the volumes of photos, when I got to something I hadn’t seen before, I make note of it.

In one particular best six, was a fuzzy image of a wall mount corkscrew.  I scanned it, and with a little photoshop, enlarged it so I could get a clearer image.

genapp

Okay, maybe not so clear.

But, I knew that eventually I would find a similar one.

Fortunately, there was a description of this wall mount attached to it, so I did have an idea of what I was looking for…  a “General Appliance Co.” wall mount.

After years of searching around, a General Appliance Co.” wall mount corkscrew is heading to the island…

generalappliance

Marked GENERAL APPLIANCE CO.  SO. CHARLESTON W.VA. PAT. PEND.  this very well could make my best six of the year.

Of course, now the hunt for information on General Appliance Co. of So. Charleston will begin.

Let’s see if we can’t find some literature about this unusual wall mount.

Stay Tuned!

Adding “Simon Lewis” to the Clough list…

As mentioned in the past, there have been several lists published regarding known examples of Clough medicine/advertising corkscrews, both wire or flat band, and sometimes both.  Appearing both on Don Bull’s website, as well as in the Spring 2015 issue of The Bottle Scrue Times, finding a Clough with advertising that isn’t on these lists is pretty cool.

The other day, I happened to click over to eBay, and what should appear, but a folding Clough corkscrew with advertising that wasn’t the usual Listerine, Rawleigh Man, or Goldman’s…

With pretty low Buy it Now attached to said listing, I promptly hit the appropriate button, paid, and then visited both Don’s site, and shortly thereafter Barry’s list.

Nope!

Not on either.

It has yet to arrive, but from the description and the images, it looks to read:

COMPLIMENTS

— OF —

SIMON LEWIS

WINES AND LIQUORS

ROCK ISLAND,

—- ILLS —

sl1sl2sl3

No reference to any inside markings from the seller.  I will provide updates when it arrives.  But, who is Simon Lewis…

As a company, Simon Lewis advertised regularly in the Rock Island Argus and Daily Union, and if one was to spend a dollar, you would get a free bottle of California Wine.

After a bit of digging, I found a couple of references to Simon Lewis and a revolver that was a free gift with purchase.  Finding that a little odd, I happened upon an advertisement that showed the revolver as a “free gift.”

simonlewis

Who wouldn’t want to drink wine from a revolver shaped bottle?

A nice addition to the Clough advertising corkscrew collection!

“…clever advertising novelty (patented).”

From the January 10th 1915 edition of  the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jan10spielbauer

FOR sale outright, clever advertising novelty (patented), with dies complete; sells quickly; big profits; owner too far west to manufacturers: snap: sample free.  Josephine Spielbauer.  71 Columbia st., Seattle, Wash.

In doing research into the Josephine Spielbauer patent not much information or history has been uncovered.  I have since been in contact with a Spielbauer family member, and we are exchanging information.  A most recent email set about yet another search, and the above classified ad came up.

spielbauer

So, Miss Josephine was selling her patent and dies as well to create the corkscrew/opener.  Could it be the “samples” that she sent out, are the few pieces that exist within our respective collections?

Interesting also to note.  The Spielbauer patent was awarded in November of 1914, by 1916 the state of Washington implemented prohibition (earlier than the rest of the country).

No more beer?  Would production of corkscrews and openers cease as well?

 

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

From an 1889 issue of The Iron Age

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

This article, patented April 16, 1889, is manufactured by the Empire Knife Company, West Winsted, Conn.  Its form and

empireautomaticcorkextractor

general construction are show in the accompanying illustration.  A spring in the head detaches the handle from the corkscrew rod, so that the corkscrew does not turn in the cork while pulling out, and the corkscrew can be set to turn any distance into the cork, so that the cork need not be pierced through, thus saving it for use again.  The power of this corkscrew is referered to as such that the hardest corks can be pulled with ease.

Of course, the Empire Automatic Cork Extractor is the Seymour L. Alvord and Edward E. Brown patent of 1889 (number 401,672).  Not often turning up with a patent mark, when they do, they are marked “PAT. APR 16 ‘89.”

This one still eludes me, if you have an Alvord and Brown patent with which you would like to part, I have plenty of tradebait available!

Send your order today, pin a dollar bill to coupon below and the shipment will go forward to you the same day as received.

From an issue of Air Wonder Stories, November 1929

Ten Tools in One

A SMALL but handy article which serves every possible need of the all-round mechanic.  In valuable in any emergency.  An excellent combination of all utilities for the household featured:  HAMMER—KNIFE-SHARPENER—NAIL-PULLER—BOTTLE-OPENER—SCREW-DRIVER—CORK-SCREW—CAN-OPENER—WEIGH-SCALE—RULER—TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Just glance at the illustration and you will see how really useful this article is.  The “Ten in One Tool” is 10 inches high and finely nickel-pated.

aldersonpatentillustration

The new tool is not only handy in the household, but every TOURIST, AUTOIST, CAMPER, PICNICKER, BOYSCOUT, FISHERMAN, CANOEIST, etc., should carry in his bag one of these indispensable combination tools.  No SHOP, OFFICE, STORE, GARAGE, FARM, BOAT, should be without one.  Price $1.00 POSTAGE PAID.

Be the first one to own the “Ten in One” in your town.

Send your order today, pin a dollar bill to coupon below and the shipment will go forward to you the same day as received.

GRENPARK TOOL CO.

245 Greenwich St.

New York

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – –

Greenpark Tool Company

245 Greenwich Street,
New York, N.Y.

Enclosed find a $1.00 for which please send me prepaid your “Ten Tools in One

Name

Address

Town                                       State…..

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – –

Now, we know the “Ten in One Tool” as the Frederich J. Alderson patent of 1932.

Alderson (having already obtained a Canadian patent) was awarded his American patent for a Combination Tool (# 1,845,038) on February 16th.  85 years ago tomorrow!

img_5390

a leg up…

Sometime around Christmas, I ran across an online advertisement for a Detroit leg corkscrew.  And, the person was asking $122.00.  That of course seemed fair enough given the photo.   I responded in short order, asking about other pictures and the like.

In response, the person said, that they would like a bit less than their original asking price, and explained that they decided on 122, as they needed to put something out there, and given the corkscrew was patented in 1894, at it being–when the ad was placed–2016, the 122 year old corkscrew was given a 122 dollar price tag.

After then exchanging phone numbers, I accepted their reduced price, and promptly sent monies.

After payment was made, and accepted.  It was the last thing I heard from the seller.

They promised to send pictures and tracking, and…

And, then nothing.

Being a (somewhat) patient person, I just waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

No emails, no phone calls, no tracking numbers…and, more importantly, no Detroit leg.

After a couple of weeks, I sent an email, which garnered no response.  And, I picked up the phone a couple of times, only to reach voicemail, and no return phone call.

I waited a bit longer.

Last week, closing in on a month later, I sent another email.  This one was a little more…shall we say, blunt and to the point.

The next morning, I received an email with apologies and explanations, and a promise that the leg would be mailed of that day…and, this was followed up by an email with tracking information.

Yesterday, the leg indeed arrived.  And, my faith in humanity restored.  This leg is the plain variety, and there is some areas of finish loss, but it is nicely marked, and has a nice snap to the corkscrew.

img_00034

Thanks for the deal unnamed-detroit-plain-leg-corkscrew-sellers, and I hope that everything improves for you both.

This leg would be a double/duplicate for me, so feel free to offer up any trades you might have!  If you would like information on the Detroit Cork Screw Company, check out my Detroit Cork Screws page

let the bidding begin…

After writing the post about the folding Greeley cork puller, I received several inquiries asking to purchase the piece.

As the offers were pretty much the same, and not wanting to play favorites, I told the interested parties that I would put it up for auction, thusly taking favoritism and friendship out of the mix.

All the inquirers and offerers are indeed friends, and when you all are offering the same amount, or close to the same amount, how/who would I choose?

So… the Greeley is currently up on eBay, with a few bids already.

If  you are interested in tossing out a bid, or just want to watch the bidding action, you can link to the eBay listing here.

Stay tuned!

 

Dead Ringer…

As mentioned on the Edward Leverich Hall post, there was mention that Hall (or his company) possessed the patent rights.  So…I started to look for a patent.  In doing so, I found several references to patents for poison indicators or poison warning devices, but one poison indicator, in particular, I was excited to find.  After a little more research, I ran into an article in a 1915 issue of Pharmaceutical Era

POISON INDICATOR

Many mechanical inventions have been devised for apprising individuals of the poisonous contents of bottles that they may be called upon to handle.  One of the most recent devices of this character is the invention of Mahalah T. Hudson, Kirksville, Mo. (Patent No. 1,131,839), shown in the pharmadrawaccompanying illustration.  It comprises a frame formed from a blank and provided with a central body, upon which are formed integral arms bent upward as to me at their end portions; a bell carried by the ends of said arms, integral plates formed upon said body and extending at right upper angles thereto, said plates being adapted to rest upon the upper portions of a cork of a bottle for retaining the frame in its correct vertical position, and spurs extending downwardly from the lower portion of the body for digging into the cork whereby the poison indicator will be held in engagement and rest evenly on the upper portion of the cork.

And, might be saying to yourself, “Okay, not so fast Josef, there isn’t a screw, there are two spurs…”

Yes, you would have a point there…  But, if you look at the other illustration from the patent drawing, that wasn’t shown in the Pharmaceutical Era blurb, there IS a corkscrew.

hudsonbell

That little bell that you have in your collection, is indeed a patent.  And, a dead ringer for the patent drawing!

bellpoison

A patent for a poison indicator.  And, one that does not appear in the front or the back of O’Leary.

The 1915 Hudson patent #1,131,839…

Corkscrewing Around 2016

It is New Year’s Eve, and it has been an exciting year of corkscrew collecting, corkscrew adventures, and wonderful times with the lovely personal personal trainer.

We will start ringing in the new year a little earlier this year, as the wine shop is hosting its second annual “Bubble Bath” and we will start popping corks and pouring wine at about 3 o’clock…

Tomorrow morning we will be off to Portland for a quick getaway, and then it will be back to corkscrewing around.

There have been many many many corkscrews acquired this year, some remain in the collection, some have been passed on to others, and it truly is amazing what is still out there in the wild.

There have been visits to the island from Leon,  adventures with Tommy at Brimfield, visits with Leon, Tommy, and the lovely in Chicago, adventures to Toronto to visit Joe, Monika, Ron and Marilyn, trades, deals, purchases, sales, auctions, the construction of the “corkscrew room,” the annual meetings in Nanaimo and Vancouver, multiple trips to California (with some good finds) and so many exciting adventures in between. And, there have been so many other exciting events. Truly a great year for corkscrewing.

We wish you all an upcoming year of peace, good health, love, and a few corkscrews!