Evil Clown

Just the other day, I was perusing our second favorite auction site, and a listing popped up for a “Evil Clown corkscrew figurine ceramic or possibly syraco dist. by King.”

redclown

The piece had a more colorful paint job than usual, but over the years several color variations have turned up.

And, the buy it now price wasn’t bad at all.  I decided to go for it.

clownie

I don’t know if the clown is truly evil.  And, it isn’t ceramic, but it is Syroco and it will make a nice addition to the collection.

Or Tommy’s collection…

syroco

Whatcha got to trade TC?

Looks like there is a space for him in front of the white clown with black hair next to the stained monk…

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Auction lots end today

Well, it is that time of year folks.  The latest collectorcorksrews.com auction lots start ending today at 1:00.  You can link to them here.

There are some great corkscrews this time around; and the bidding is already hot and heavy.  Which lots will skyrocket due to bidding wars, remains to be seen.  But, there are already a couple that are garnering lots of bids.

Be sure to check it out!  Bid high, and bid often!

Taps and Corkscrews for Effervescing Liquids

perry

DIRECTIONS FOR USE:

Clench the handle in the left hand with the nozzle projecting outward through the fingers.  With the right hand hold the bottle at the bottom (see Fig. C), and press or screw it (the bottle) forward.  When the point appears through the Cork, direct nozzle into the tumbler, into which, with a further turn or two, the liquid will rush.  Do not use corkscrew to break wire or string.  To preserve the remainder, draw or screw the bottle backwards till the holes are brought well within the Cork, afterwards keeping the bottle neck downwards.  The pointed form (Fig B.) should be withdrawn till about ¼ of an inch of the point shows.

  • Keep the internal slide tube shut whenever pasting through cork. When desired, push it open with the backs of the fingers of the left hand acting beneath the disc.

 

hooper

Just in case you have a Hooper’s patent, and wanted to use it…

On another corkscrew note: no corkscrews or moose were found at Moosehead Lake.  Although, we did utilize one on a great bottle of McPrice Meyers.

Of course, the big corkscrew news, is that there are 720 lots upon which to bid on the latest corkscrewcollectors.com auction.

Bid high, and bid often.  You can link to the auction here.

Perry & Co’s Improved Patent Corkscrews

From the May 1882 copy of Perry & Co’s Monthly Illustrated Price Current:

perryco

 

twiggsad

These Corkscrews are a vast improvement on the ordinary Corkscrews as they give a great increase of power to the drawer, and will be found to save much trouble. The Cork is extracted by simply continuing to turn the screw after it has pieced the Cork.  When lined with India Rubber, the neck of the bottle ensured against breakage.

 

 

 

twiggyblog

 

off to Moosehead

The lovely personal personal trainer and I are off to Moosehead Lake for a few days, if any corkscrews (or mooses) are found along the way, I will report back here.

moose

Speaking of finding corkscrews, or cork pullers rather, this cork puller hook, is on its way to the collection.

newhook

If you have cork puller with which you would like to part, feel free to drop me a line!

From a 1903 DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. catalog

From an 1903 DUNHAM, CARRIGAN, & HAYDEN CO. catalog:

dunhamcatalog

The two corkscrews illustrated up top, are both Frary Corkscrews.  Interestingly, what DUNHAM, CARRIGAN, & HAYDEN CO. are calling the No. 240, wasn’t illustrated within 1889 copy of The Iron Age: A Review of the Hardware, Iron and Metal Trades, which was where Kenneth Cope found the images that identified the corkscrews as made by Frary in his book Kitchen Collectibles; this same issue of Iron Age became the basis of my article Finding Frary, which you can link to here.

There are some collectors that have asked me, was the non-hammer-non-ice-pick Frary a production item, or was it that their hammer and spike had gone missing.

Well, this clearly answers the question!  A production corkscrew, that cost 25% less than the Ice Pick and Breaker Version!

No. 240—5 inch, Self Drawing, Revolving Bell, Convex Twist, Cast Steel, Fancy Iron Handle, Full Nickel Plated .. Per Doz $6 00

241—5 inch, Same as above, with Ice Pick and Breaker …………………………. $8 00

Dozen per box

frary240Frary241OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

“avoids all unnecessary shaking of the bottle…”

From a 1922 issue of The Export World and Commercial Intelligence

 

A Novel Corkscrew Invention.

A corkscrew which will perform its function of extraction without spoiling the cork or making a hole in it is a novelty which should make a wide appeal.  There is firstly to be considered the saving of corks—an important matter these days—and, in addition to this, it is claimed that the patent “Stap Corkscrew” illustrated avoids all unnecessary shaking of the bottle—a point which is of considerable importance in dealing with certain wines.  In use the metal strips are pushed down gently with a rocking movement between the cork and the bottle neck.  The cork is then extracted by pulling up gently and at the same time turning the screw.  The appliance is light in weight and can be easily packed.  The invention is handled in this country by Messrs Leverlite Lamps, 23A Old Bond Street, London, W.I.

ideal

“having dose cups with each bottle”

From the February 3, 1889 issue of PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD

H. Zeilin & Co., Philadelphia, call attention in an announcement recently made to Professor Parrish’s preparations, and especially Parrish’s Compound Syrup of Phosphates. Chemists who have had experience in the manufacture of Compound of Phosphates are aware that it is almost impossible to make it perfect and prevent deposit, fermenting and change, but J. H. Zeilin & Co., having purchased the private formulas of Parrish’s specialties, take especial pains to make the preparations worthy of the name of the distinguished chemist.  The articles are referred to as put up in a very attractive style, having dose cups with each bottle, rendering them very desirable articles to handle.  The following at the prices of the different preparations, terms cash 30 days:

                                                                                    Per doz.

Compound Syrup of Phosphates………………………..    $7.50

Glycerole of Hypophosphites……………………………     7.50

Syrup of Phosphites…………….…………………………..     7.50

Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites, with Iron….. 7.50

Syrup of Phosphate of Iron……………….………………….7.50

Syrup of Lacto-Phosphate of Iron………………..……….7.50

Bitter Wine of Iron………………………………………………7.50

Propylamin Cordial……………………….…………………..11.25

Wine of Pepsin…………………………………………………….7.50

Solution of Meconate of Morphia…………………………5.63

Elixir of Calisays……………………………………..…………..7.50

Elixir of Valerianate of Ammonia…………….………….5.63

Cephalic Snuff…………….………………………………………1.87

Dragees of Santonine…………….………………………..….1.87

Liquid Rennet…………….………………………………………1.87

We have owned several versions of the Zeilin patent in Sterling — these come in various sizes; embossed or plain.  There are also versions that have a medicine dial.

zeilsterling

And, we have a glass and metal version.

zglass

 

But, it is within the pages of Fred O’Leary that there is Zeilin Dosage cup carrying the patent date, and also serving as an advertisement for one of the Hypophosphites listed above

On page 63 of O’Leary amongst the others, this version of the Zeilin is picture and described as being marked, “ONE TEASPOONFULL PARRISHS HYPOPHOSPHITES, J.H. ZEILIN & CO. PHILA, PA”

zcup

The 1889 article says “having dose cups with each bottle.”  Was it Zeilin’s patent that was included within each box with each bottle?  What do you think?  And, if there was, why haven’t more turned up?

Do any of you have an all metal (non Sterling) Zeilin Patent dosage cup with patent date and advertising?

I would happily trade for it if you do.  Drop me a line.

G.B. ADAMS

A decade or so ago, Mark Woodard had acquired, at auction, a celluloid button pinback with an advertisement for R.V. Pierce.  He submitted photos and information to Don Bull, who published said information and more on his Weekly Screw page.

drpierce1

Not too long after, Jack Bandy had apparently responded with another celluloid button pinback.   This version being an advertisement for Mangels & Schmidt’s Bread, making reference to a trade that happened some time earlier between he and Don.  This too found its way into the Weekly Screw pages.

tommy

And, shortly thereafter, I managed to find my own version of the pinback, this one having an image of an eye, with the words I have my “eye” on you.

eye

The pinback, on the reverse side, has three patent dates, all from the same patentee, G.B. Adams.  But the dates correspond with his patents for a Trousers Strap, Jewelry, and a Badge Pin or Button…

In reading the patent descriptions, there is no corkscrew mentioned.

US523063.pdf

US558334.pdf

US564356.pdf

The 1896 patent for the Badge Pin or Button was assigned to the Whitehead and Hoag Company.  And, each of the known examples are marked as such.

On the Mangels & Schmidt’s, the 1896 patent date is also written on the edge of the button adjacent to the worm.

adamspatentdate

When Don Bull put his American patents up for sale, Tommy acquired the Mangels & Schmidt’s from Don.  And, in a recent deal, I have now since acquired a second example of the Adams patent, this one being a duplicate to John Morris’ formerly Mark Woodard’s R.V. Pierce.

pierce

So, we have R.V. Pierce (x 2), Mangels & Schmidt’s, and the “I have my “eye” on you” versions.

What others are out there?

Do you have a G.B. Adams 1896 Whitehead and Hoag celluloid pinback corkscrew?  Drop me a line with pictures!

an eventful few days

The lovely personal personal trainer and I headed off to Chicago for a few days recently, to visit with Tommy; see his new condo, visit the old neighborhood, visit a few favorite restaurants, and of course to see his collection.

But, before our departure, I managed to win a few lots in an online auction.  These particular lots didn’t go too high, and there looks to be a few good t’s, a Murphy, a Bennit, a couple of Henshall buttons, and a couple of Adelaides (Ian) within the lots:

smallsmall3

These are on their way to the island as I type, and I will report back if there are any interesting markings on the pieces when they arrive.

The travel to Chicago was pretty seamless, and Tommy swooped in and scooped us up.  And, soon enough (he brought chilled wine and cheese with him) we were eat the condo we were renting for a few days.

Of course, TC also brought a few corkscrew with him, and there were some fantastic recent finds.

After the happy hour show and tell, we headed off to Bandera for dinner.  One of our favorite restaurants on Michigan Ave, and the meal (the Cliff Lede wines) didn’t disappoint.

The following day, lovely and I decided to walk to Navy Pier.  We don’t usually frequent that as a destination, but Nick Cave was giving a performance, and we knew we had to see it.

And, walk we did.  Meandering from Andersonville towards Wrigley field, stopping by our old condo in Boys Town, then heading towards Lincoln Park, the Zoo, and then heading on to the lakeshore to walk downtown, we made it to where the performance was being held with 15 minutes to spare; where there was cold wine available to bring into the auditorium!

The performance was fantastic!

nickperf

nickcave

Following the performance, and having walked 9.1 miles to get there, we grabbed an uber back to the condo, picked up some wine and cheese, and had another happy hour with TC before heading to RL (Ralph Lauren’s restaurant) for dinner.

three

Another fantastic meal!

After getting back to the condo, we shared goodbyes, and see ya tomorrows, as the next day we were going to hop on the train out to Elgin to see Tommy’s collection and condo.

Hopping on the El, we were soon at Union Station where hoped on the Metra to Elgin.  Tommy picked us up, and after a requisite stop to pick up some wine, we were soon pulling into Chez Campnell.

And, if you were wondering why he is referred to as the Syrocokid…

syroco

He has a few Syroco corkscrews…

Having only recently moved in, there are boxes and boxes of corkscrews to go through, but there were plenty to see, examine, drool over, and there was almost a deal made for a couple; an unusual Murphy and an Atwood Combination Six.

tcandme

The deal wasn’t made, but you never know what trades might happen at a future date!

After lunch and corkscrew viewing, we headed off on another adventure; looking at potential corkscrew cases for our corkscrew room on Vinalhaven, and then hugs and goodbyes and see you in a month (when Tommy visits Maine) and then it was back to the train.

Knowing we had an early morning flight the next day, the lovely and I had an early dinner at Le Colonial (another one of our favorite places in Chicago) and then made our way back to the condo.

A great few days with the lovely and TC in a city that we love.  Thanks for a great visit TC!