Ladies Friend…

On Sep. 02, 1879, Benjamin N. Shelley of Anderson, Indiana was awarded patent number 219,313 for his Improved Combination Implement for Domestic and Other Uses.

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When the Shelley turns up, it is usually found with a PATD APLD FOR marking (with the two D’s in superscript) as well as the mark “LADIES FRIEND.”

In Shelly’s patent drawing, he explains:

My invention consists of a combined implement for domestic and other purposes, which presents in a single device and compact form the functions of hammer, screw-driver, cork-screw, can-opener, ice-pick, glass cutter and breaker, stove-lifter, tack-drawer, saw-set, knife-sharpener, wrench, steak-tenderer, and putty-knife.

That is a lot of uses.

And, a lot of hyphens…

That said, when the “LADIES FRIEND” turns up, they almost always have damage to the corkscrew.  Odd turns, broken tips; it makes you wonder what material Shelley used for the corkscrew, or perhaps people in 1878 opted to use the corkscrew as the stove-lifter or steak-tenderer…

Still, it is fabulous combination multi-tool with corkscrew that I would love to add to the collection…

If you have a “LADIES FRIEND” laying around, feel free to drop me a line at Josef@vintagecorkscrews,com

Of course, feel free to email regarding any antique corkscrews with which you wish to part.

 

Matthews’ 1893 patent arrives…

Yesterday, the Matthews patent door securer with corkscrew arrived, and it didn’t disappoint.

Nicely marked, it is in fabulous condition with a sharp helix, and it is an awesome addition to the collection.

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Marked PAT APL’D FOR

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Note: the door securer is threaded, and screws into the center piece.

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As mentioned previously, it is marked for Matthews’ 1892 patent, as his 1893 patent is a combination of his 1892 patent with the addition of the case and corkscrew in 1893.

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And, the corkscrew does function as a peg and worm, with the door securer serving as the peg.

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I haven’t tried this out yet…as a corkscrew NOR as a door securer…

Noyes-es

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In 1906, Harry Noyes was awarded patent # 824,807 for his cork extractor.

And, while not rare, it is a neat little corkscrew, that often turns up with advertising for GREEN RIVER WHISKEY, THE WHISKEY WITHOUT A HEADACHE

And, underneath the lever, they are marked with Universal June 27, ‘05-July 3, ‘06,” as he had an earlier patent–and actually later patents as well.

Noyes was awarded another patent in 1908 Patent for a Pocket Cork Extractor.

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Anyone have the 1908 patent?

That said, there are other examples other than the Green River, with the blank version being a little harder to find.

Still, there are others that utilized the Universal Lever Cork Extractor as a vehicle to market their products.

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In 2017, Jack had a foursome of Noyes-es for sale, two with advertising for Green River, one blank, and one that featured advertising for WM. MENSTELL, 465 LENOX AVE. N.Y.

I have several examples of the Noyes.  Both the Green Whiskey and the blank

But also: BROTHERHOOD WINE CO., 328-334 SPRING ST. N.Y.

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And, recently picked up a Noyes that has advertising for OLD JERSEY WHISKEY, WILLIAM FRIES

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In the JFO (Just for Openers) handbook, they have a listing for the NOYES (known in JFO speak as a P-041) carrying an advertisement for OLYMPIA YES! IT’S THE WATER.

But, this leads me to a question for all of you.  Do you have a Noyes with different advertising.  Feel free to drop me a line, and let’s see what we can come up with!

 

BROTHERHOOD WINES CO. 328-334 SPRING ST. N.Y.

Blank / No Advertising

GREEN RIVER, THE WHISKEY WITHOUT A HEADACHE

OLD JERSEY WHISKEY, WILLIAM FRIES

OLYMPIA YES! IT’S THE WATER

WM. MENSTELL, 465 LENOX AVE. N.Y.

 

Pearl Wedding Select Whiskey

One of the coolest aspect of collecting, is that over the years, as you develop friendships with other collectors, your collecting friends will make trades with you knowing that they have something you want.  And, of course, you are well aware of corkscrews that will also fit within their collections.

And, as word has gotten out that I am on the 1903 Lowenstein patent hunt, TC offered up his Pearl Wedding Select Whiskey example as part of a trade.

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In doing research into Lowenstein and those that used his patent as a vehicle for advertising, Pearl Wedding is key, as within their advertising at the time, they actually feature a corkscrew attached to their bottle.

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On the two bottles on the right, the Lowenstein is shown…

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Hmmmm… reduce the size of the image, rotate clockwise, erase the background…

Looks like it should fit…

 

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A really cool addition to the collection.  Thanks for the deal TC!

If you have a similar corkscrew, with different advertising, I am interested!

 

Weiss-Eichold

This morning, while sipping coffee, I was checking email, and JM sent in a photo of the two Lowenstein patents in their collection.

One was a red A & P, and the other, I had never seen or heard of before, serving as an advertisement for:

WEISS – EICHOLD

LIQUOR CO.

MOBILE

ALA

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With a little research, it appears that Weiss-Eichold was wholesale dealer of Liquors, Cigars, and Tobaccos, and apparently a  “Rectifier of Spirits.”

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And, they produced brands such as A BIG HIT whiskey, GOLDEN CREAM whiskey, and blended brands such as BELLE OF MOBILE, RAG TIME, and SIMON SUGGS.

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Awesome to add another Lowenstein to the list  Thanks JM!
Keep them coming.
Thus far the here is the known examples…

“BAILEY’S H & C PURE RYE”

“FRANCIS H LEGGETT & CO. NEW YORK”

“F. WESTHEIMER & SONS, PLANET, SOUR MASH, ST. JOSEPH, MO”

“HANCE BROS. & WHITE, PHARMCL CHEMISTS PHILADELPHIA”

“HUMPHREY & MARTIN’S FINE WHISKEYS PHILAD“ (in yellow or tan)

“PEARL WEDDING RYE”

“PEARL WEDDING SELECT WHISKEY”

“THE GREAT A & P TEA CO. EXTRACTS” (in red or yellow/tan).

“WEISS-EICHOLD, LIQUOR DEALERS, MOBILE, ALA”

What others are out there?
What Lowenstein patents do you have in your collection?

 

 

Looking for Lowenstein…

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I am currently working on an article on the 1903 Lowenstein patent corkscrew.

In looking at the past collectorcorkscrews.com auctions, these sometimes are referred to as a:

“Clough Corkscrew with hang tag”

“Clough Corkscrew with advertising tab”

“Clough Corkscrew with hanging tag”

“Clough Corkscrew with adverting tag”

“Clough Tin Lithograph Hanging Tab”

And, within O”Leary – the Lowenstein patent of 1903–and Fred explained that these were most likely made by Clough.

Lowenstein, amongst other illustrations, shows this in his patent:

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There are several known variations of advertising on the Lowenstein, and I am just trying to compile a list of known examples.  

So, if you have a Lowenstein patent with advertising (or without advertising if such an animal exists) please let me know.

I would be interesting in adding your version to the list.  And, if you want to send pictures of yours, feel free to email me at josef@vintagecorkscrews.com

Here is the current list of Lowenstein’s that I have seen:

 

“BAILEY’S H & C PURE RYE” 

“FRANCIS H LEGGETT & CO. NEW YORK”

“F. WESTHEIMER & SONS, PLANET, SOUR MASH, ST. JOSEPH, MO”

“HANCE BROS. & WHITE, PHARMCL CHEMISTS PHILADELPHIA”

“HUMPHREY & MARTIN’S FINE WHISKEYS PHILAD“ (in yellow or tan)

“PEARL WEDDING RYE”

“PEARL WEDDING SELECT WHISKEY”

“THE GREAT A & P TEA CO. EXTRACTS” (in red or yellow/tan).

 

What others are out there?  Drop me a line!

 

 

 

 

The Norvic Corkscrew Mystery

Just the other day, a patent pending corkscrew was ending on eBay, and while on my watch list, I forgot to place a bid.

I don’t have the Norvic rack and pinion, and would love to add one to the collection if you have one.

And, in some ways it was good that I didn’t throw out a bid, as the winning bidder was Bob G.

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After this win, we were exchanging messages about the piece, and we began to wonder who Norvic is / was.

That said, before we start heading down that path, Bob was messing around with the rack and pinion corkscrew, and noticed that the helix seemed a little loose.

He explained, “While inspecting the Norvic closely, I thought what?  A loose helix?  But, on further inspection, I discovered it was equipped with a replaceable helix.”

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Our exchange continued, and we set about trying to determine who Norvic might be.

Now, there is a Norvic Shipping, but they were established in the last 20 years, and we know this corkscrew has some relative age to it.

But, who (or what) is Norvic???

As you all know, I do get a little obsessive about this type of thing, and I started looking closely at the handle and the markings.

Is there information present that might help inform the search?

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As you will notice, the NORVIC is not just a marking, but appears to be a very intentional font choice; a logo perhaps?

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And, then there is the patent pending mark.

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What is that odd set of characters just after U.S.A?  Is this a clue?

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What is the purpose of this?

Decoration?

Ancient alien code?

Perhaps a clue as to the mystery of Oak Island?

That all said, Bob and I thought it would make for an interesting discussion.  And, so we put it out to all of you in blogland: Who (or what) is Norvic?

I did come up with a couple of options, but let the search commence.

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Norvic Shoes?

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Norvic Lager?

Who is Norvic!!!!????????!!!!!!!!??????

Do you know who Norvic is?  And, whether you have ideas, or have the definitive answer, drop me a line at josef@vintagecorkscrews.com

And, if you have a Norvic corkscrew with which you would wish to part, feel free to email me as well.

Dog’s Head Guinness

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If you look closely at the Dog’s Head Brand Bass and Guinness advertisement, you will notice there is a corkscrew on the ground, and the bottle in the chap’s hand has wires that would serve to keep the cork within its confines.

Of course, the cellarman at his feet wouldn’t assist in cutting those wires.

However…this would probably work splendidly.

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And, not coincidentally, it is marked across the handle, “DOG’S HEAD GUINNESS.”

A fun addition to the collection…

Best or Favorite Find…

This morning, had life been normal, I would have woken up before daybreak, and headed out from some airbnb the lovely and I would have rented, and made my way to the antique mecca known as Brimfield–this would have been the second day of Brimfield’s May show.

On Wednesday morning at Brimfield, the first field opens at 6 a.m., and after buying your ticket for 5$, people line up waiting to get in.

And, and the appointed time, I would head off on the hunt;  peaking into darkened areas with a flashlight, and over the course of the morning, asking the question and getting a similar response countless times:

“Do you have any antique corkscrews.”

Only to be met with, “What?”

“Corkscrews…”

followed by the internationally recognized pantomime of pulling a cork

On occasion, the response is in the affirmative, and sometimes, just sometimes, something fabulous is unearthed, sometimes emerging from a case, just laying out on a table, and on one or two occasions, emerging from a dealer’s pocket knowing that I would make my annual May sojourn to the fields of Brimfield, and they were holding it back for me.

That said, with the show being cancelled this year, I thought I would share some of my Brimfield finds from over the years, and also share my favorite find.

The images below, are all from various trips to Brimfield, and all are corkscrews found in those fields…

 

 

I will have to admit, when I got the collection at Brimfield, it was a banner day…

There have indeed been some fabulous finds at Brimfield, and these are just the from a few years of attending.  Over the years, you would be amazed at what turns up, and this is with other corkscrew collectors roaming around Brimfield as well–and also making fabulous finds.

Still, despite some rare variations of the legs, and some cool patents, that have been picked up in May, July, or the September shows, there is one corkscrew that is my favorite Brimfield find.

And, that would be the A.W. Stephens patent.

It was on an early morning, on the first day of the show, and in a dark tent, I found a tray of Clough corkscrews, and noticed one that looked a little different.  And, feeling for the end–opposite where the corkscrew would go it, it was hollowed out.  I paid the asking price, and brought it into the early daylight to reveal the cigar perforator that was hidden inside.

It made my best six of that year, and was a very cool find whilst traipsing the fields.

While there have been lots of other finds, in various antique malls, stores, and similar, I would love to hear from each of you about your favorite find at you regular antique show.

If there is a regular antique show that you go to, or a regular large flea market that you attend, what has been your best or favorite find in the wild?