Brother Placido Vogliotti

Okay, I am pretty sure that Placido Vogliotti wasn’t part of Christian Brothers Winery in California…

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But the 1910 the Italian patent by Placido Vogliotti with folding Folding collar does turn up on occasion with the marking  THE CHRISTIAN BROTHERS, FROMM & SICHEL, INC., SAN FRANCISCO, CA. / 1908.

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And, the other day, I managed to pick one up for a song–not that I actually sang.

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Since I focus on American corkscrews, this will probably be offered up for trade.

Anyone need a 1910 Christian Brothers Vogliotti?  Drop me a line.

 

the Symes Building

In 1906 the Symes Building was built in Denver, Colorado; having been designed by the architectural firm of Hunt and Hunt of New York.

It was one of the first steel framed buildings in Denver and housed the downtown Woolworth’s store on its ground floor for years.

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Judge George Gifford Symes was a Judge in Denver who had the structure built on 16th and Champa streets, after the original building burned in 1905.

The building used steel framing; the “other” Chicago style, as compared with Chicago style hotdogs, which do not use steel in their construction…

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Why are you telling us this, you might ask yourself…

So, on a favorite online auction site, I just picked up a Williamson Roundlet that advertises the Symes Building in Denver.

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Marked “COMPLIMENTS OF THE SYMES BUILDING BUFFET, SYMES BUILDG, DENVER,” I wonder what libations were available at the buffet?

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New Old Stock

As the story goes, when I was first collecting corkscrews, the lovely and I were in Maine on a quick getaway.  And, armed with my 5 dollar budget for each corkscrew, it was pretty cool that I came away with a few decent corkscrews.

One of those first few was an 1876 double helix Clough, and while I have told the story before, I regretted the purchase a little at first, as it was so perfect, I wondered if it was new.

It wasn’t new.

What had happened was that the dealer had run into some “new old stock.”

It was genuinely an 1876 double helix Clough, but it was recently discovered–with several others–in an old barn/warehouse.

Shortly after moving to Chicago, on eBay there appeared an identical new old stock Clough double helix.   In looking closely at the listing, the seller was in Maine, and after making a purchase, I inquired if they had others.

It was indeed the same dealer, that I had met in Maine, and I negotiated to buy the rest of his new old stock.

The majority of these–close to a dozen–ended up going with me to the CCCC AGM that year, and they were dispersed across attendees’ collections via the buy and sell.

Interestingly, just the other day, I was traipsing across Montsweag flea market, and towards the end of the field, an older dealer was there, and amongst his wares were two new old stock 1876 Clough double helix corkscrews.

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Given it was this vicinity of Maine where I made the purchase of that first new old stock Clough…I couldn’t resist.

I bought both.

And, the price was still within my 5 dollar budget…

 

Walker Pegs and the Auction

Okay, sometimes I can’t help myself…

I really like the Walker peg and worm corkscrew.

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And, so when one recently appeared on eBay, I just had to have it.   It makes a nice addition to the Walker peg collection…

One will probably note, that I have an extra Walker worm, missing the peg.

If anyone has spare, I would be happy to take it off of your hands.

On an collectorcorkscrews.com auction note, the listings start ending tomorrow.  Be sure to check them out!

ooooh, something shiny

Over the last week, on eBay, there was a fabulous Perille Express waiter’s corkscrew that was  garnering lots of bids.

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Knowing that this would go for a pretty penny, I kept it on my watch list, and the corkscrew listing ended today, for bargain price of $ 3,559.27.

(I didn’t win it)

And, it came with the box!

Such a fabulous corkscrew!

The Milam history hunt continues

While I am still on the hunt of the history of the Kentucky Cork Extractor, there is definitely some history out there about the Milam’s in Kentucky and the fishing reels they made.

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And, Milam reels are quite sought after, by the way.  You all might to keep a look out for them.

That said, as I am working out the history of the company, and when John W., joined his father in the family business, I did find a picture of the inventor of the Kentucky Cork Extractor…

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And, of course, here is his invention: The Kentucky Cork Extractor…

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I have no doubt the story will end up as an article at some point, but until then, the hunt continues…

Catching up a bit…

I recognize that it has been a few days since we last talked…

Or, that I last wrote, and you last read, so I figured we should catch up a bit.

The lovely bride and I have been hopping back and forth from the island to the mainland a bit.  First to spend a few days with friends for the Thanksgiving holiday–we supplied the wine, oysters, and lobster, they took care of the Turkey…

and also to do some construction projects on our house in Rockland–the latest was replacing a supporting beam / header in the stairway–if you were taller than 5’9″ descending the stairs would inevitably result in a bump on the head, or alternatively knocking yourself out, should you not duck.

In the 1880’s, when the house was built, the builder must have been a bit shorter than average.

So, I put in a post to support the floor above, cut away the old joist, and installed a new one a few inches back.  This allows for a little headroom, and reduces the risk of concussion whilst traipsing up and down the stairs–unless you are over 6’6″.

After ensuring that we were properly supported, we started framing in a new bathroom on the second floor.  I met with a plumber yesterday, and tomorrow I head back over to put in a couple more walls.  By the weekend, it should be pretty much ready for the rough-in.

Meanwhile, while we are not on the mainland, we are on the island with normal day to day activities; Sue teaching exercise classes and me running the wine shop.  And, of course there is a bit of corkscrewing going on.

No fantastically rare finds as of late, but I have picked up a couple of interesting pieces here and there.

One a Marwood registered corkscrew, and the other a Nogent Chrome knife with folding corkscrew.  Neither are American, so they are destined to be traded, but both were fairly priced.

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Also, we have registered for both the 2019 ICCA and CCCC meetings in Lofoten, Norway and Stratford upon Avon, England

We are super excited for our next adventure, and today we will start booking out hotels.

And, this morning, I am editing a few submissions for the upcoming issue of The Bottle Scrue Times.  A fun issue to put together, as this one (largely) focuses upon the Maine Annual General Meeting.

Of course, as we close out November and look to December, we have one month left of the corkscrew collecting fiscal year, and choosing a best 6 for 2018 will soon begin.  What will yours be?

Stay tuned…