Does no Injure the Cork

From a 1913 Shapleigh Hardware Company catalog:

“QUICK AS A WINK”

 Does not Injure the Cork

Directions

connie

Take the Puller into the hand so that the handle rests in the palm, putting the thumb on one tine and the forefinger on the other.  Adjust the tines to size of Cork by pressing thumb and forefinger together, insert the tines each side of the cork between Cork and Neck of Bottle, work the tines carefully below the bottom of the cork by pushing one tine then the other (a rocking motion).  When the tines are well below the bottom of the cork turn the Puller around and around, at the same time pulling very gently.  Around goes the Puller, Cork and all, and out rides the Cork on the tines and drops from the Puller without labor injury to cork or spilling contents.

If the cork has flattened edges out over neck of bottle push the tines through the flattened edges and operate as above; for Cork in bottles of Glue, Mucilage or other adhesive matter insert the tines in two or three different places before turning the Puller.   Per dozen.

No. 35—Tempered Blued Spring Steel Tines; Maple Handle, Mahogany Stained and Varnished; Nickel Plated Brass Case; Length Closed 4 in; Lengh of Handle 3 in; Weight per dozen 3 lbs………………. $ 4.00

One Dozen in a Box.

didn’t you mention a trade???

In yesterday’s Brimfield recap, I did mention a trade.

Yes, a trade.

A few weeks back, Tommy picked up an Sterling and Ivory handled Gorham prong puller that resembles a Converse.  It shares many similarities with the Converse patent, with the biggest exception being that instead of the 1899 patent date, it reads STERLING 97, and SPAULDING-GORHAM–the sheath is also marked STERLING

Spaulding & Co., originally was S. Hoard & Co., but in 1920 was bought by Gorham Mfg., and changed the name to Spaulding-Gorham Inc.  The name remained until 1943, when it was changed to Spaulding & Co, in 1943.  So, we can at least but date range to the cork puller; somewhere between 1920, but before 1943.

In a 1941 Spaulding-Gorham Catalog, they feature a similar cork puller.  The lines are pretty similar, but it is described “Wine Cork Puller, sterling, and is illustrated with a Sterling handle, rather than one of Ivory and Sterling.

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Do any of you have the Spaulding-Gorham that is entirely Sterling?

After Tommy picked it up, we had discussed trade.  And, he threw out several options that would seal the deal.  That said, after I picked up the General Appliance wall mount with corkscrew, that was what he really wanted.  But, given that I had been trying to find that particular corkscrew for well-over a decade, I just didn’t want to part with it.

The conversation went back and forth over the course of the Brimfield adventure; scarcity, rarity, desirability, value, etc…  And, it continued with possible trade scenarios.

On Wednesday, Tommy presented another offer.  We had batted around a couple in the preceding days…  Folding Greeley patent and the half sized signed Clark, in exchange for the Spaulding-Gorham prongs.

I thought about it for a minute or two.  Tommy has a thing for the smaller (but not miniature) corkscrews, and I have thing for Converse and other prong pullers, so after grabbing a small Hall’s Red Devil Skull poison indicator corkscrew from his stash and placing it next to the prongs, I agreed.

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I also promised, that should I ever begin to trade and/or sell the General Appliance wall mount, that he would get the right of first refusal.

But, given that it will surely make my best six for 2017, I am guessing it will be sticking around.  I am thinking the Spaulding-Gorham prongs will also make the best 6!

Thanks for another epic trade TC.  There have been so any over the years, and I look forward to the next one!

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

From an 1889 issue of The Iron Age

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

This article, patented April 16, 1889, is manufactured by the Empire Knife Company, West Winsted, Conn.  Its form and

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general construction are show in the accompanying illustration.  A spring in the head detaches the handle from the corkscrew rod, so that the corkscrew does not turn in the cork while pulling out, and the corkscrew can be set to turn any distance into the cork, so that the cork need not be pierced through, thus saving it for use again.  The power of this corkscrew is referered to as such that the hardest corks can be pulled with ease.

Of course, the Empire Automatic Cork Extractor is the Seymour L. Alvord and Edward E. Brown patent of 1889 (number 401,672).  Not often turning up with a patent mark, when they do, they are marked “PAT. APR 16 ‘89.”

This one still eludes me, if you have an Alvord and Brown patent with which you would like to part, I have plenty of tradebait available!

If you are only going to buy one thing at the local flea…

It was a fabulous week.  The lovely personal personal trainer and I were in Florida for the past seven days, and arrived back home yesterday.

We visited with John and Martha for the first few days, enjoying their hospitality, the beach, the boat, a bit of fishing, and some fantastic food and wine.

From Marathon, we headed north to Palm Beach where we spent a night on our own, before heading towards Orlando and ultimately The Villages with a wonderful visit at Barry and Marty’s new digs.  We also visited the Morse Museum in Winter Park, which houses the largest collection of Tiffany stained glass and other Tiffany creations.  It was mind blowing.

Of course, there are a few corkscrews at Barry and Marty’s place, and I got to see some of the new additions that have been added since the last time we saw the collection.

Laughs, wine, food, corkscrews…it was a great time, and in between, Barry, the lovely, and I headed to a (relatively) local flea market that given MLK holiday was going to be bigger than usual.

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After our arrival, the lovely and I headed one direction, whilst Barry headed another, and we agreed to meet up at an appointed time.  There were a few things about, not a bunch of corkscrews, but a few.  And, largely they were the common variety–but fairly priced.

With still an hour before we were to meet up, I looked under a table where I found a small tin of buttonhooks.  At 6 dollars a piece, I was hopeful that there might be a folding bow with corkscrew with buttonhook.  Asking the dealer if I could dump out the tin to examine them closely, I flipped over the tin and rifled through.

No corkscrews and buttonhooks were present, however…

I know, the suspense is killing you.

There was indeed something worth buying within that tin–well what was previously within the tin and now was spread out over a small blanket.

And, it wasn’t a buttonhook.  But, it could easily be mistaken for one.

I do already own one of these, but to find one in the wild is rather exciting…

(Would you get to the point already?  What was it?)

While the lovely picked up a nice mechanical Anri stopper, what was amongst the buttonhooks was the only thing I purchased that day.  But, if you are only going to find one thing at the local flea, it is a nice thing to find.

Speaking of, while we were walking up to meet Barry, also at the flea was corkscrew collector (and carved alligator collector) Tom Staley.  It was nice to catch up, and perhaps we will finally make the trade we have been negotiating for 6 years.

He said he will bring the corkscrew I am after when he visits Brimfield (and then Maine) in May, and I will bring the corkscrew he is after.  We shall see if they finally change hands.

What was the purchase at the flea in Florida?

A folding Greeley patent, clearly marked with the patent date.  A great find, especially given the asking price!

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Given the Greeley is a double/duplicate…I am guessing the trade or outright purchase offers will be pouring in shortly!

A great week away, and now we are back home in Maine.  A bit of snow on the ground, and it is back to corkscrewing around!

Chick Can Opener

From a 1911 issue of Commercial America, Volume 8.

Chick Can Opener

To open a can with the Chick Can Opener illustrated herewith, the opener is simply set to the proper size, the center disc placed on the center of the can and by slight pressure on the large center holder, the pins penetrate the can.  A turn of the long handle then cuts a circle open in the can.  The straight blade at the end is used for opening square or odd-shaped tins and is provided with corrugations to prevent slipping.

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The Chick Can Opener is offered for export by the Andrews Wire and Iron Works, 80 Griswold Street, Detroit, Michigan.  It is made in two styles, one for ordinary household use and a larger one for hotel use, the latter opening any cans up to the one-gallon size.

“The Chick Can Opener?” you ask.

Well, sure.  This particular can opener was patented in 1908 by Oscar F. Braconier, and was assigned to our man Oscar F., but it was also assigned to one Thomas Chick.

Hence the Chick Can Opener…

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I don’t yet have this patent, but I would happily trade heavily for it.  Or, perhaps make an outright purchase.  So, if you have the Chick Can Opener (with corkscrew), feel free to drop me a line.

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This would start the 2017 corkscrew collecting year off right.  Do you have one?

 

More inside information

As mentioned yesterday, Don Bull checked his Clough medicine corkscrews, and forwarded those that are marked on the inside of the band.

Here are a few more:

The Red Star Cough Syrup in our collection is marked on the inside with:

CLOUGH’S CORK-SCREW

PROMPT-SAFE-SURE

PAT. JULY 22, 84

And, the Judson’s Dye on our collection is marked:

 

CLOUGH’S IMPROVED CORK SCREW

PAT. JULY 22-84

The Warner’s Log Cabin Remedies in our collection is marked on the inside:

CLOUGH’S  CORK-SCREW

OF YE OLDEN TIMES.

PAT JULY 22-84

What Clough medicine band corkscrews do you have in your collection that are marked on the inside?

And, while we are on the topic.  I am on the hunt for another Clough.  This one carries the patent date on the outside.  If you have this Clough which is marked across the top “CLOUGH’S PATENT JULY 22, 1884,” please drop me a line:  I would love to have it.

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Conversing…

As you regular readers know, I have a thing for Converse cork pullers.  Sure, they turn up with some regularity, but that only adds to the excitement of finding a variation that you don’t have.

And, just the other day, a Converse patented cork puller was put up on eBay with a very low Buy it Now.

At all of about 12 dollars, had it been a normal Converse, it still would have been snapped up, but this one–once again–carries advertising across its sheath.  Moreover, it happens to be an advertisement that we don’t have in the collection.

12 dollars…don’t own it?  How could I not?

So, I clicked, paid, and awaited its arrival.

And, yesterday the “MURRAY HILL CLUB, WHISKEY, JOS.A. MAGNUS & CO, CINCINNATI, O.” Converse arrived.

This makes the 13th different advertisement that appears on the Converse sheath, or alternatively the handle, within our collection–although I know of at least still two others in other collections.

Interestingly, Jos. A. Magnus is now being produced again by the great grandson of Jos.A. Magnus…  You can link to an article about that venture here.

Not coincidentally, another package arrived today, and it too contained a Converse!  This time it has the original box and some instructions–in French.

conversing

Soon enough, these will be added to the Converse page.

If you have a Converse cork extractor with advertising, drop me a line!

Well, if you have any old, antique, vintage, or unusual corkscrews feel free to drop us a line…