1883 ACME CORKSCREW

In an 1880 John Pritzlaff Hardware Company catalog, there is an illustration of a corkscrew that looks familiar…

…with the description,

“ACME, ” “, Nickel Plated Ferrule and Cap, Convex Twist, Hardwood, ” ” 8 00

For those wondering the quotation marks are from the corkscrew pictured above it, reading Cast, Iron, Handle, and Per Doz.

So, it would read…

Acme — Cast Iron, Nickel Plated Ferrule and Cap, Convex Twist, Hardwood Handle, Per Doz. 8 00

That said, in the illustration itself, the corkscrew shows that it is marked ACME across the bell and has the patent date of June 12, 1883.

Of course, with that patent date, we know that this is the Thomas Strait patent (279,203) of 1883…

But, do any of you have a Strait patent marked ACME? Drop me a line if you do!

J.T. Haviland…

In July, I shared a patent image from the back of O’Leary; the J.T. Haviland patent of 1870 for his “Cork Screw.”

And, within that bloggy blog entry, I wondered why the patent would read “Cork Screw,” then clearly there is no helix present, but also wondered if I would ever find an example, as there had yet to have been one presented in any book, other than the drawing in the back of O’Leary.

After reading through the patent description, and thinking about it. While the tool was indeed intended to remove the twine / wire from champagne corks, one would then use the tool as a cork gripper, and then turn the cork out of the bottle; essentially screwing it out. So… Cork Screw does somewhat make sense.

And, as it happened, an example of J.T. Haviland patent was discovered, and did make its way to the island. During our ICCA AGM / Show & Tell I shared images of the patent, and it definitely is a nice fit within the collection.

A departure from the patent drawings with a different hinge, and no brush in the handle, it is marked J.T. HAVILAND, PAT. APPD. FOR., it surely will make the best 6 of the year!

DON’T LET ANY WOMAN STRUGGLE with a corkscrew and risk cutting her hands to open tightly corked catsup, olive, pickle, medicine, or any other bottles.

From a 1903 issue of Harper’s Monthly Magazine

The YANKEE Cork Puller Should be in Every Home

DON’T LET ANY WOMAN STRUGGLE with a corkscrew and risk cutting her hands to open tightly corked catsup, olive, pickle, medicine, or any other bottles.

THE YANKEE is screwed against upright surface ; Icebox, Sideboard, Door Frame, or Wall.

IT’S ALWAYS THERE.  No hunting for a corkscrew, always ready to draw the tightest cork from any bottle.  It never slips, never breaks the bottle.

Hold the bottle in position.  Raise the handle and the screw enters the cork.  Lower the handle, the tightest cork comes out, clean and whole, leaving no broken bits in the bottle, ad it is automatically discharged from the machine.

THE YANKEE CANNOT BREAK.  Considering that this cork puller is practically indusestructbil and cannot get lost, you must realize that while its possession may be a luxury its purchase is eurel an economy. Settle this problem for a life time by ordering to-day. 

It’s fairly fabulous…

The Von Gieson arrived the other day, and it is fabulous.

A nice addition to the collection.

What might turn up next?

On an antiquing note, the Union Antiques show in Maine has been cancelled for this year, “due to a supply chain issue experienced by our supplier of tents and tables…”

Really?

Yes. Really.

Maybe a trip to Brimfield in September is in order…

We shall see…

Ham’s Patent Cork Puller

From an issue of American Stationer

CORK PULLER

There is always more or less difficulty in getting corks out of bottles.  Many a knife has been broken and still the cork moved not.  A patent cork puller has been brought out which overcomes all these troubles and saves the cork besides. 

HAM’S PATENT CORK PULLER.

The accompanying illustration shows what it is.  To work it insert the blades between the bottle and cork, rock it forward and back until a firm grip is secured, then turn and pull gently.  It never fails to work, and saves both bottle and cork for future usefulness.  The retail price is 10 cents, and the New York News Company will supply the trade.

As the article explains, this is, “Ham’s Patent Cork Puller.” That would be Herbert H. Hamm and his patent for a cork-extractor (#702,001) awarded June 10, 1902.

And, Triple H explains in his patent description:

“In a cork-extractor, the combination of a resilient bow or fork, a hollow handle embodying a plurality of open-ended hollow parts, the said open-ended hollow parts being adapted for engagement with each other, one of the said hollow parts being slotted to receive the arms of the bow or fork adapted to be alternately contained within the said handle and to be fitted therein to extend from the said handle, the middle portion of the bow being adapted to form a bearing against the interior of the hollow handle, substantially as described.”

While I have yet to find a Herbert H. Ham patent, and not for a lack of looking, there have been a couple found–and when found (see O’Leary page 117) they are marked “PAT APPL’D FOR.”

As shown in O’Leary

If you happen to have one, I would love to add it to the collection.

O.K. Cork Puller

Within a 1900 catalog entitled:

CATALOG ~

BOTTLERS’

EXTRACTS

AND

COLORS

MACHINERY

AND

SUPPLIES

SETHNESS COMPANY

THE LARGEST EXTRACT AND COLOR MANUFACTURERS

IN AMERICA ~

262 – 268 N. CURTIS ST

CHICAGO, U.S.A

Amongst other corkscrews, we find The O.K. CORK EXTRACTOR…

How the O.K. cork extractor extracts remains to be seen.

I mean, clearly there is some leverage involved, but to what type of appendage does the cork attach…so the lever can do its assigned job?

Is it a helix that exists within the piece that attaches to the wall, with the bottle screwed on to it?

The search continues.

BROWNE & BENTON

On May 17, 1892, William G. Browne and John L. Benton were awarded patent # 475,222 for their “Can Opener.”

And, when this can opener turns up, as shown in the patent drawings, it is marked with the patent date and also with NEVER SLIP.

For those of you thinking, that the date rings a bell, it should, as W. G. Browne was awarded a patent in 1895 for another can opener; patent # 541,034

And, when that can opener turns up (with the addition of a fold out corkscrew) it is marked with both patent dates; for 1892 and for 1895, and is also marked KING.

A later version, maintains the 1895 patent date, but then adds a 1908 patent date; which is Reynold’s patent (#896,577) for a combination tool; also marked the KING, with the patent was assigned to Browne and Dowd MFG. Co.

The other day, I picked up yet another version, that predates the 1895 patent, and references the 1892 patent.

A departure from the NEVER SLIP form with leanings toward the 1895 Browne, it is marked PAT. MAY 17-92 AND PAT PEND’D.

And fortunately, includes corkscrew…

A fun addition to the collection.

Lavin & Kitchen ~ Lavin & Lauer

5 years ago today, I received in the mail from TC, the top of a bar spoon jigger (without the jigger spoon part) that included a corkscrew.  He apparently had intended to send it to me as a b-day gift, but couldn’t find it until a few months after said b-day had occurred.

His note, at the time read:

“Knew what I wanted to give you but couldn’t find it… Found it! Happy birthday Brother. See you in a few weeks.”

tcgift

It has been sitting in the corkscrew collection since, and was a welcome addition.

The missing spoon would look something like this:


However, there are several versions of the spoon with jigger, and finding the right one appropriate to the corkscrew top has proven somewhat difficult.  Actually, the jigger spoons show up from time to time, but it is difficult to figure out which jigger spoon should be the appropriate fit.

Until recently!

For those of you that receive The Bottle Scrue Times, thanks to DC, we have come to learn that the little bar tool with jigger spoon is actually a patent.  And, was made by Lavin and Lauer.

The patent was granted to James A. Lavin and Edgar M. Kitchen for a design patent for their “Bulk Measuring Device” # 84,090 on May 5, 1931.

Following a bit of sleuthing, after reading Dick’s article, and having my much appreciated b-day gift from Tommy at the ready, the other day I finally managed to find the appropriate spoon to which the corkscrew is supposed to be attached.

Thanks again TC!  And, thanks DC for the fabulous write-up and discovery!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ladies Legs Corkscrews… One dollar and ten cents each…

Also, from the 1913 Shapleigh Hardware Company catalog…

leggy

BALLET Per Dozen

No. 537—Bright Forged Steel Screw,

Length 2 5/8 inches; Folding Handle,

Pocket Knife Style; Steel Springs;

German Silver Lined; Assorted

Blue and White and Red and

White Celluloid Handles with

German Silver tips; Length

Folded 2 5/8 inches: Weight per

Dozen 1 1/2 lbs           $ 13.20

One Dozen in Box

Does no Injure the Cork

From a 1913 Shapleigh Hardware Company catalog:

“QUICK AS A WINK”

 Does not Injure the Cork

Directions

connie

Take the Puller into the hand so that the handle rests in the palm, putting the thumb on one tine and the forefinger on the other.  Adjust the tines to size of Cork by pressing thumb and forefinger together, insert the tines each side of the cork between Cork and Neck of Bottle, work the tines carefully below the bottom of the cork by pushing one tine then the other (a rocking motion).  When the tines are well below the bottom of the cork turn the Puller around and around, at the same time pulling very gently.  Around goes the Puller, Cork and all, and out rides the Cork on the tines and drops from the Puller without labor injury to cork or spilling contents.

If the cork has flattened edges out over neck of bottle push the tines through the flattened edges and operate as above; for Cork in bottles of Glue, Mucilage or other adhesive matter insert the tines in two or three different places before turning the Puller.   Per dozen.

No. 35—Tempered Blued Spring Steel Tines; Maple Handle, Mahogany Stained and Varnished; Nickel Plated Brass Case; Length Closed 4 in; Lengh of Handle 3 in; Weight per dozen 3 lbs………………. $ 4.00

One Dozen in a Box.