It’s fairly fabulous…

The Von Gieson arrived the other day, and it is fabulous.

A nice addition to the collection.

What might turn up next?

On an antiquing note, the Union Antiques show in Maine has been cancelled for this year, “due to a supply chain issue experienced by our supplier of tents and tables…”

Really?

Yes. Really.

Maybe a trip to Brimfield in September is in order…

We shall see…

Ham’s Patent Cork Puller

From an issue of American Stationer

CORK PULLER

There is always more or less difficulty in getting corks out of bottles.  Many a knife has been broken and still the cork moved not.  A patent cork puller has been brought out which overcomes all these troubles and saves the cork besides. 

HAM’S PATENT CORK PULLER.

The accompanying illustration shows what it is.  To work it insert the blades between the bottle and cork, rock it forward and back until a firm grip is secured, then turn and pull gently.  It never fails to work, and saves both bottle and cork for future usefulness.  The retail price is 10 cents, and the New York News Company will supply the trade.

As the article explains, this is, “Ham’s Patent Cork Puller.” That would be Herbert H. Hamm and his patent for a cork-extractor (#702,001) awarded June 10, 1902.

And, Triple H explains in his patent description:

“In a cork-extractor, the combination of a resilient bow or fork, a hollow handle embodying a plurality of open-ended hollow parts, the said open-ended hollow parts being adapted for engagement with each other, one of the said hollow parts being slotted to receive the arms of the bow or fork adapted to be alternately contained within the said handle and to be fitted therein to extend from the said handle, the middle portion of the bow being adapted to form a bearing against the interior of the hollow handle, substantially as described.”

While I have yet to find a Herbert H. Ham patent, and not for a lack of looking, there have been a couple found–and when found (see O’Leary page 117) they are marked “PAT APPL’D FOR.”

As shown in O’Leary

If you happen to have one, I would love to add it to the collection.

O.K. Cork Puller

Within a 1900 catalog entitled:

CATALOG ~

BOTTLERS’

EXTRACTS

AND

COLORS

MACHINERY

AND

SUPPLIES

SETHNESS COMPANY

THE LARGEST EXTRACT AND COLOR MANUFACTURERS

IN AMERICA ~

262 – 268 N. CURTIS ST

CHICAGO, U.S.A

Amongst other corkscrews, we find The O.K. CORK EXTRACTOR…

How the O.K. cork extractor extracts remains to be seen.

I mean, clearly there is some leverage involved, but to what type of appendage does the cork attach…so the lever can do its assigned job?

Is it a helix that exists within the piece that attaches to the wall, with the bottle screwed on to it?

The search continues.

BROWNE & BENTON

On May 17, 1892, William G. Browne and John L. Benton were awarded patent # 475,222 for their “Can Opener.”

And, when this can opener turns up, as shown in the patent drawings, it is marked with the patent date and also with NEVER SLIP.

For those of you thinking, that the date rings a bell, it should, as W. G. Browne was awarded a patent in 1895 for another can opener; patent # 541,034

And, when that can opener turns up (with the addition of a fold out corkscrew) it is marked with both patent dates; for 1892 and for 1895, and is also marked KING.

A later version, maintains the 1895 patent date, but then adds a 1908 patent date; which is Reynold’s patent (#896,577) for a combination tool; also marked the KING, with the patent was assigned to Browne and Dowd MFG. Co.

The other day, I picked up yet another version, that predates the 1895 patent, and references the 1892 patent.

A departure from the NEVER SLIP form with leanings toward the 1895 Browne, it is marked PAT. MAY 17-92 AND PAT PEND’D.

And fortunately, includes corkscrew…

A fun addition to the collection.

Lavin & Kitchen ~ Lavin & Lauer

5 years ago today, I received in the mail from TC, the top of a bar spoon jigger (without the jigger spoon part) that included a corkscrew.  He apparently had intended to send it to me as a b-day gift, but couldn’t find it until a few months after said b-day had occurred.

His note, at the time read:

“Knew what I wanted to give you but couldn’t find it… Found it! Happy birthday Brother. See you in a few weeks.”

tcgift

It has been sitting in the corkscrew collection since, and was a welcome addition.

The missing spoon would look something like this:


However, there are several versions of the spoon with jigger, and finding the right one appropriate to the corkscrew top has proven somewhat difficult.  Actually, the jigger spoons show up from time to time, but it is difficult to figure out which jigger spoon should be the appropriate fit.

Until recently!

For those of you that receive The Bottle Scrue Times, thanks to DC, we have come to learn that the little bar tool with jigger spoon is actually a patent.  And, was made by Lavin and Lauer.

The patent was granted to James A. Lavin and Edgar M. Kitchen for a design patent for their “Bulk Measuring Device” # 84,090 on May 5, 1931.

Following a bit of sleuthing, after reading Dick’s article, and having my much appreciated b-day gift from Tommy at the ready, the other day I finally managed to find the appropriate spoon to which the corkscrew is supposed to be attached.

Thanks again TC!  And, thanks DC for the fabulous write-up and discovery!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ladies Legs Corkscrews… One dollar and ten cents each…

Also, from the 1913 Shapleigh Hardware Company catalog…

leggy

BALLET Per Dozen

No. 537—Bright Forged Steel Screw,

Length 2 5/8 inches; Folding Handle,

Pocket Knife Style; Steel Springs;

German Silver Lined; Assorted

Blue and White and Red and

White Celluloid Handles with

German Silver tips; Length

Folded 2 5/8 inches: Weight per

Dozen 1 1/2 lbs           $ 13.20

One Dozen in Box

Does no Injure the Cork

From a 1913 Shapleigh Hardware Company catalog:

“QUICK AS A WINK”

 Does not Injure the Cork

Directions

connie

Take the Puller into the hand so that the handle rests in the palm, putting the thumb on one tine and the forefinger on the other.  Adjust the tines to size of Cork by pressing thumb and forefinger together, insert the tines each side of the cork between Cork and Neck of Bottle, work the tines carefully below the bottom of the cork by pushing one tine then the other (a rocking motion).  When the tines are well below the bottom of the cork turn the Puller around and around, at the same time pulling very gently.  Around goes the Puller, Cork and all, and out rides the Cork on the tines and drops from the Puller without labor injury to cork or spilling contents.

If the cork has flattened edges out over neck of bottle push the tines through the flattened edges and operate as above; for Cork in bottles of Glue, Mucilage or other adhesive matter insert the tines in two or three different places before turning the Puller.   Per dozen.

No. 35—Tempered Blued Spring Steel Tines; Maple Handle, Mahogany Stained and Varnished; Nickel Plated Brass Case; Length Closed 4 in; Lengh of Handle 3 in; Weight per dozen 3 lbs………………. $ 4.00

One Dozen in a Box.

General Appliance Co.

Several years ago, I was sent a collection of past best sixes.  Not the actual corkscrews, but binders of photos and printouts of various collectors best six corkscrews from years prior.

Interestingly, some of these best sixes consisted of a single photograph, some would be a typed up report with several photos, and still others would be a little more elaborate.  As I paged through the volumes of photos, when I got to something I hadn’t seen before, I make note of it.

In one particular best six, was a fuzzy image of a wall mount corkscrew.  I scanned it, and with a little photoshop, enlarged it so I could get a clearer image.

genapp

Okay, maybe not so clear.

But, I knew that eventually I would find a similar one.

Fortunately, there was a description of this wall mount attached to it, so I did have an idea of what I was looking for…  a “General Appliance Co.” wall mount.

After years of searching around, a General Appliance Co.” wall mount corkscrew is heading to the island…

generalappliance

Marked GENERAL APPLIANCE CO.  SO. CHARLESTON W.VA. PAT. PEND.  this very well could make my best six of the year.

Of course, now the hunt for information on General Appliance Co. of So. Charleston will begin.

Let’s see if we can’t find some literature about this unusual wall mount.

Stay Tuned!

“…clever advertising novelty (patented).”

From the January 10th 1915 edition of  the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jan10spielbauer

FOR sale outright, clever advertising novelty (patented), with dies complete; sells quickly; big profits; owner too far west to manufacturers: snap: sample free.  Josephine Spielbauer.  71 Columbia st., Seattle, Wash.

In doing research into the Josephine Spielbauer patent not much information or history has been uncovered.  I have since been in contact with a Spielbauer family member, and we are exchanging information.  A most recent email set about yet another search, and the above classified ad came up.

spielbauer

So, Miss Josephine was selling her patent and dies as well to create the corkscrew/opener.  Could it be the “samples” that she sent out, are the few pieces that exist within our respective collections?

Interesting also to note.  The Spielbauer patent was awarded in November of 1914, by 1916 the state of Washington implemented prohibition (earlier than the rest of the country).

No more beer?  Would production of corkscrews and openers cease as well?

 

a leg up…

Sometime around Christmas, I ran across an online advertisement for a Detroit leg corkscrew.  And, the person was asking $122.00.  That of course seemed fair enough given the photo.   I responded in short order, asking about other pictures and the like.

In response, the person said, that they would like a bit less than their original asking price, and explained that they decided on 122, as they needed to put something out there, and given the corkscrew was patented in 1894, at it being–when the ad was placed–2016, the 122 year old corkscrew was given a 122 dollar price tag.

After then exchanging phone numbers, I accepted their reduced price, and promptly sent monies.

After payment was made, and accepted.  It was the last thing I heard from the seller.

They promised to send pictures and tracking, and…

And, then nothing.

Being a (somewhat) patient person, I just waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

No emails, no phone calls, no tracking numbers…and, more importantly, no Detroit leg.

After a couple of weeks, I sent an email, which garnered no response.  And, I picked up the phone a couple of times, only to reach voicemail, and no return phone call.

I waited a bit longer.

Last week, closing in on a month later, I sent another email.  This one was a little more…shall we say, blunt and to the point.

The next morning, I received an email with apologies and explanations, and a promise that the leg would be mailed of that day…and, this was followed up by an email with tracking information.

Yesterday, the leg indeed arrived.  And, my faith in humanity restored.  This leg is the plain variety, and there is some areas of finish loss, but it is nicely marked, and has a nice snap to the corkscrew.

img_00034

Thanks for the deal unnamed-detroit-plain-leg-corkscrew-sellers, and I hope that everything improves for you both.

This leg would be a double/duplicate for me, so feel free to offer up any trades you might have!  If you would like information on the Detroit Cork Screw Company, check out my Detroit Cork Screws page