the sixth…

Okay… I have narrowed the list. I do have the best five figured out, unless something incredible turns up in the next two weeks. So, let’s try this one more time. What single corkscrew should make the list?

The Will & Finck and the Matthews patent are in… And, based on your previous votes, I have narrowed the other options.

gotta start compiling…

Already, there have been several best sixes (fantastic ones, btw) that have found their way into my email box from various collectors from across the globe.

And, for those of you that participate in this requisite behavior every year, it is time to start compiling, sorting, photographing, and documenting your best six corkscrews of the year.

I am close to making a decision on our best six, but I am still holding out hope that something in the coming three weeks will push a current best candidate off the 1st through 6th place corkscrew podium.

Not that there is an actual corkscrew podium–although I am considering building one.

Nor will there be a an official best six ceremony or anthem.

Although…there will probably be some adult beverages involved.

Let the best six building commence! What are your best six?

Matthews’ 1893 patent arrives…

Yesterday, the Matthews patent door securer with corkscrew arrived, and it didn’t disappoint.

Nicely marked, it is in fabulous condition with a sharp helix, and it is an awesome addition to the collection.

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Marked PAT APL’D FOR

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Note: the door securer is threaded, and screws into the center piece.

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As mentioned previously, it is marked for Matthews’ 1892 patent, as his 1893 patent is a combination of his 1892 patent with the addition of the case and corkscrew in 1893.

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And, the corkscrew does function as a peg and worm, with the door securer serving as the peg.

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I haven’t tried this out yet…as a corkscrew NOR as a door securer…

Some Old Cork Extractors

From a 1913 issue of Scientific American:

Some Old Cork Extractors.

The necessity of some form of cork extractors is experienced by all, and it may be interesting to review some of the well known implements shown in the accompanying illustration, all of the devices pictured being found among expired patents.

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A selection of old cork extractors found among expired patents.

In A we find a device pierced at its lower end to penetrate the cork, and provided with a short pivoted cross bar for alining with the shank as the last is forced through the cork, but turning at a right angle to withdraw the cork.


The corkscrew B has a handled pivoted to the corkscrew part and a prop is also pivoted oo the handle and it may be rested against the bottle lip to form a fulcrum for the handle so the last can operated as a lever and pull the cork; while C illustrated a simple wire cage for withdrawing the corks that have been forced down into the bottle.


A double lever in scissors shape is presented in D, and this can be used in connection with any handled corkscrew. The sketch E shows a stand to rest upon a bottle, and having threaded a shaft carrying the screw and a separate nut operating on the threaded shank to pull the cork.


Simple extractors having blades to project down on opposite sides of the cork, are represented in F and G. Sketch H shows an extractor in which a stand mounted on the bottle neck has at its upper end a windlass connected by a chain with the corkscrew, so that it can exert force to pull the cork.


In I is shown an extractor adapted to be secured to a bench of counter and supplied with a hand lever, whose rack segment operated when moved in one direction to force the corkscrew into the cork, and when reversed, to pull the cork out of the bottle so as to free the cork from the screw.


J represents a novel form of corkscrew which can be folded as shown in the smaller engraving to conveniently carry in the pocket, and can then be opened as shown in the larger one, to operate first as a handled corkscrew in turning the screw into the cork and then as a lever in extracting the cork from the bottle: and K represents a bench or counter extractor in which as screws turns into the cork and a spring when compressed aids in the drawing the cork from the bottle.

Suitcase of corkscrews

A week or so ago, the lovely lovely personal trainer was on the mainland, and I was on the island.  And, she sent me a message with a picture of the exterior of an antique shop, and asked if I had ever been there.

Surprisingly, I hadn’t.

I responded with that bit of information, and we made plans for a visit when the next opportunity presented itself.

Yesterday, was that opportunity.

After spending the morning working on the house on the mainland, we headed off to Camden for lunch, and then following lunch, headed further north.  As we turned off the main road, after a mile or so, there was the antique store.  And, as it was Sunday, it was closed up.

Oh well, we shall try another day.

We kept driving, and decided to explore the environs.

After a bit of driving and exploring, we looped back around, and suddenly there were two vehicles in front of the antique store.  We pulled in, and the owner opened up the doors.  He apparently had an appointment to meet with someone, but given we pulled up, he decided to open for business.

The shop certainly looked promising!

We meandered the shop, and there were some interesting items.  And, eavesdropping on his conversation a bit, it was clear he sold on eBay, and had been in business for sometime.

As I was searching, I managed to find a small pile of corkscrews and openers, and while they were mostly common, there was a Noyes patent amongst them.  I kept that one in my hand, and continued the search.

About 5 minutes later, I came around a corner, and there was the owner, asking if I had yet found any treasures.  I responded with, “one so far.”

I followed up with, “I see you have some corkscrews over there, do you have any others.”

His expression changed.

He grinned a little, and said, “well, yes…and no.”

He then proceeded to tell me the story of how years ago, someone had asked him to find some corkscrews for him, and he amassed a sizable collection.

He told me of his “Sarracho Gold Armor” corkscrew with the head that comes off, that he sold on eBay for 1800, the 5 pair of ladies legs, and how selling corkscrews got him through a long winter one year.

After a few more stories, he explained that he had a suitcase filled with them, and asked where we were from.  I explained, and he said, come back any day but Wednesday, and he would unearth them for us.

I inquired as to how far away was this suitcase.  About 700 yards, he responded.

Wishing to finish up with his other customers, he said, “Give me 5 minutes, and let me think about it.”

Then, “Okay, let me close up the doors, and then follow me.”

He climbed into his truck.  And, we climbed into our own, and followed him to his house.

In the garage, after moving a couple of chairs, and stepping over a lawnmower, under a workbench was a large suitcase.  If it was full, it would be pretty heavy.

He picked it up with little effort, and then handed it to me.  “Go put that on the tailgate of my truck,” he said.   “That will be our office.”

I put the suitcase down, and clicked one half of the lock.  He clicked the other, and with anticipation I opened the lid.

Yes, it was a suitcase of corkscrews!


I went through the corkscrews, and we discussed how he amassed the collection, and how he has sold off the best stuff.   Still, there were a couple of treasures within the suitcase.  And, I did buy four.

We also exchanged information, and he promised to call when he finds others.

A fun adventure, and a terrific find by the lovely lovely.

Wishlist for 2018

There are actually a lot of things that are on my wishlist for 2018: peace, understanding, love, good health, etc., but there are also a few corkscrews that I would like to add to the collection.

Over the last couple of years, I have published the corkscrew wishlist, with hopes that someone might say, “Hey, I have one of those.  Let’s make a deal.”

Here are the wish lists from a few previous years.  And, given that we publish our best sixes each year, I have limited it to six each year…

2014:

1. Trunk Patent
2. Folding Hicks & Reynolds
3. Frary with Can Opener handle
4. Jenner Patent
5. Philos Blake (how can we have a dog named Philos, and not have the corkscrew)
6. Sperry Patent

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I did end up acquiring both the Trunk and the folding Hicks and Reynolds in 2014, and so the wishlist was updated with a few others that I would love to add to the collection.

2015:

1. Frary Sullivan Bar Screw
2. A new discovery from the Back of O’Leary
3. Frary with Can Opener Handle
4. Jenner Patent
5. Philos Blake Patent
6. Sperry Patent

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But remained the same in 2016

2016:

1. Frary Sullivan Bar Screw
2. A new discovery from the Back of O’Leary
3. Frary with Can Opener Handle
4. Jenner Patent
5. Philos Blake Patent
6. Sperry Patent

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And, while there were new discoveries from the back of O’Leary, and few that didn’t appear in O’Leary, the Frary Sullivan, Frary with can opener, Jenner, Philos Blake, and the Sperry remain illusive.

So… they are still on the list.  Yes, the list from 2017, and now the wish list for 2018!

2018 Wishlist:

1. Frary Sullivan Bar Screw
2. A new discovery from the Back of O’Leary
3. Frary with Can Opener Handle
4. Jenner Patent
5. Philos Blake Patent
6. Sperry Patent

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But, what corkscrews are on your wish list?  What corkscrews do you most hope to find this year?

Feel free to respond with what you really want to add to your collection this year (email me if you are so inclined)

And, I will gladly post them on the bloggy blog, and perhaps someone will respond to your list with: “Hey, I have one of those. Let’s make a deal.”

 

 

“having dose cups with each bottle”

From the February 3, 1889 issue of PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD

H. Zeilin & Co., Philadelphia, call attention in an announcement recently made to Professor Parrish’s preparations, and especially Parrish’s Compound Syrup of Phosphates. Chemists who have had experience in the manufacture of Compound of Phosphates are aware that it is almost impossible to make it perfect and prevent deposit, fermenting and change, but J. H. Zeilin & Co., having purchased the private formulas of Parrish’s specialties, take especial pains to make the preparations worthy of the name of the distinguished chemist.  The articles are referred to as put up in a very attractive style, having dose cups with each bottle, rendering them very desirable articles to handle.  The following at the prices of the different preparations, terms cash 30 days:

                                                                                    Per doz.

Compound Syrup of Phosphates………………………..    $7.50

Glycerole of Hypophosphites……………………………     7.50

Syrup of Phosphites…………….…………………………..     7.50

Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites, with Iron….. 7.50

Syrup of Phosphate of Iron……………….………………….7.50

Syrup of Lacto-Phosphate of Iron………………..……….7.50

Bitter Wine of Iron………………………………………………7.50

Propylamin Cordial……………………….…………………..11.25

Wine of Pepsin…………………………………………………….7.50

Solution of Meconate of Morphia…………………………5.63

Elixir of Calisays……………………………………..…………..7.50

Elixir of Valerianate of Ammonia…………….………….5.63

Cephalic Snuff…………….………………………………………1.87

Dragees of Santonine…………….………………………..….1.87

Liquid Rennet…………….………………………………………1.87

We have owned several versions of the Zeilin patent in Sterling — these come in various sizes; embossed or plain.  There are also versions that have a medicine dial.

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And, we have a glass and metal version.

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But, it is within the pages of Fred O’Leary that there is Zeilin Dosage cup carrying the patent date, and also serving as an advertisement for one of the Hypophosphites listed above

On page 63 of O’Leary amongst the others, this version of the Zeilin is picture and described as being marked, “ONE TEASPOONFULL PARRISHS HYPOPHOSPHITES, J.H. ZEILIN & CO. PHILA, PA”

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The 1889 article says “having dose cups with each bottle.”  Was it Zeilin’s patent that was included within each box with each bottle?  What do you think?  And, if there was, why haven’t more turned up?

Do any of you have an all metal (non Sterling) Zeilin Patent dosage cup with patent date and advertising?

I would happily trade for it if you do.  Drop me a line.

G.B. ADAMS

A decade or so ago, Mark Woodard had acquired, at auction, a celluloid button pinback with an advertisement for R.V. Pierce.  He submitted photos and information to Don Bull, who published said information and more on his Weekly Screw page.

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Not too long after, Jack Bandy had apparently responded with another celluloid button pinback.   This version being an advertisement for Mangels & Schmidt’s Bread, making reference to a trade that happened some time earlier between he and Don.  This too found its way into the Weekly Screw pages.

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And, shortly thereafter, I managed to find my own version of the pinback, this one having an image of an eye, with the words I have my “eye” on you.

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The pinback, on the reverse side, has three patent dates, all from the same patentee, G.B. Adams.  But the dates correspond with his patents for a Trousers Strap, Jewelry, and a Badge Pin or Button…

In reading the patent descriptions, there is no corkscrew mentioned.

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US558334.pdf

US564356.pdf

The 1896 patent for the Badge Pin or Button was assigned to the Whitehead and Hoag Company.  And, each of the known examples are marked as such.

On the Mangels & Schmidt’s, the 1896 patent date is also written on the edge of the button adjacent to the worm.

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When Don Bull put his American patents up for sale, Tommy acquired the Mangels & Schmidt’s from Don.  And, in a recent deal, I have now since acquired a second example of the Adams patent, this one being a duplicate to John Morris’ formerly Mark Woodard’s R.V. Pierce.

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So, we have R.V. Pierce (x 2), Mangels & Schmidt’s, and the “I have my “eye” on you” versions.

What others are out there?

Do you have a G.B. Adams 1896 Whitehead and Hoag celluloid pinback corkscrew?  Drop me a line with pictures!

JFO handbook listings…

As mentioned yesterday, the Voigt Brewing Davis is a new discovery.  But, given that I have quite a few Davis/Detroit and Puddefoot/Detroit corkscrews with advertising, brewery and otherwise, I decided to revisit the JFO handbook listings to what other advertising was out there.

And, it looks like there is some more hunting to do… (the ones in bold, I do already have…)

According to the Just for Openers Handbook, here are the variations of brewery advertising (this does not include non-brewery advertisements) that appear on the Davis Detroit Corkscrew, Davis Detroit Corkscrew with Knife, and Puddefoot Detroit Corkscrew:

Davis/Detroit Corkscrew (P-002, in JFO speak)

COMPLIMENTS OF GERKE BREWING CO. CINCINNATI

COMPLIMENTS OF THE GREENWAY BREWING CO.

COMPLIMENTS OF THE GREENWAY BREW’G CO. SYRACUSE, N. Y.

LOCK CITY BREWING CO.

COMPLIMENTS MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. “GILT EDGE”

COMPLIMENTS OF MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO “EXPORT WEINER”

COMPLIMENTS OF MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO “GILT EDGE”  

COMPLIMENTS OF PABST BREWING CO. MILWAUKEE

COMPLIMENTS OF JOS. SCHLITZ BREWING CO.  

THE VOIGT BREWERY LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U. S. A. “EXPORT RHINEGOLD”

THE VOIGT BREWERY LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U.S.A. “DRINK RHINEGOLD” (will soon be added to the handbook).

VOIGT BREWERY CO. LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U.S.A

VOIGT (V IN TRIANGLE AND CIRCLE) DETROIT  

Davis/Detroit Corkscrew with Knife (P-185, in JFO speak).

COMPLIMENTS OF PABST BREWING CO. MILWAUKEE.  

Puddefoot/Detroit Corkscrew (P-70, in JFO speak).

COMPLIMENTS OF GREENWAY BREW’G CO. SYRACUSE, N. Y.

COMPLIMENTS MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. “GILT EDGE”

Of course, going through the handbook listings, gives one pause.  There are two different versions of the Greenway Brewing Davis, two variations of the Minneapolis Gilt Edge Davis, and four variations of the Voigt Davis!

With the variations in advertising, you might want to check your Davis corkscrews to see if you have one that isn’t on the list.

Want to access the handbook, and other Just For Openers information?  Click here!