JFO handbook listings…

As mentioned yesterday, the Voigt Brewing Davis is a new discovery.  But, given that I have quite a few Davis/Detroit and Puddefoot/Detroit corkscrews with advertising, brewery and otherwise, I decided to revisit the JFO handbook listings to what other advertising was out there.

And, it looks like there is some more hunting to do… (the ones in bold, I do already have…)

According to the Just for Openers Handbook, here are the variations of brewery advertising (this does not include non-brewery advertisements) that appear on the Davis Detroit Corkscrew, Davis Detroit Corkscrew with Knife, and Puddefoot Detroit Corkscrew:

Davis/Detroit Corkscrew (P-002, in JFO speak)

COMPLIMENTS OF GERKE BREWING CO. CINCINNATI

COMPLIMENTS OF THE GREENWAY BREWING CO.

COMPLIMENTS OF THE GREENWAY BREW’G CO. SYRACUSE, N. Y.

LOCK CITY BREWING CO.

COMPLIMENTS MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. “GILT EDGE”

COMPLIMENTS OF MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO “EXPORT WEINER”

COMPLIMENTS OF MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO “GILT EDGE”  

COMPLIMENTS OF PABST BREWING CO. MILWAUKEE

COMPLIMENTS OF JOS. SCHLITZ BREWING CO.  

THE VOIGT BREWERY LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U. S. A. “EXPORT RHINEGOLD”

THE VOIGT BREWERY LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U.S.A. “DRINK RHINEGOLD” (will soon be added to the handbook).

VOIGT BREWERY CO. LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U.S.A

VOIGT (V IN TRIANGLE AND CIRCLE) DETROIT  

Davis/Detroit Corkscrew with Knife (P-185, in JFO speak).

COMPLIMENTS OF PABST BREWING CO. MILWAUKEE.  

Puddefoot/Detroit Corkscrew (P-70, in JFO speak).

COMPLIMENTS OF GREENWAY BREW’G CO. SYRACUSE, N. Y.

COMPLIMENTS MINNEAPOLIS BREWING CO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. “GILT EDGE”

Of course, going through the handbook listings, gives one pause.  There are two different versions of the Greenway Brewing Davis, two variations of the Minneapolis Gilt Edge Davis, and four variations of the Voigt Davis!

With the variations in advertising, you might want to check your Davis corkscrews to see if you have one that isn’t on the list.

Want to access the handbook, and other Just For Openers information?  Click here!

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Rhinegold v. Rheingold

A few years ago, there was a Davis / Detroit corkscrew with advertising listed on eBay.  And, I went after it.  The advertising read: THE VOIGT BREWERY LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U. S. A.,  “EXPORT RHINEGOLD.”

At the time, there were two other variations of the Voigt Brewing Davis known.  One that reads, VOIGT BREWING CO. LTD. DETROIT, MICH. U.S.A., the other with VOIGT (V IN TRIANGLE AND CIRCLE) DETROIT.

So, I went for it.

I tossed out a healthy bid, only to watch that bid get doubled up (and then some) as the piece when into the multiple hundreds of dollars.  Apparently, it was the first known example of this marking.

Yesterday, a similar Davis was put up for sale on eBay, but this time with a pretty healthy buy it now.

That said, the Buy It Now price was healthy for the seller, mind you…not for the buyer.

I saw the listing.  I thought about it (for all of about 10 seconds) and clicked.

It was far less than the one that sold in 2014, after all.  And, it will make a nice addition to the Detroit Cork Screw collection…

rhine1rhine2

I will add here, that this is slightly different than the one from a few yeas ago, as the Davis doesn’t read “EXPORT RHINEGOLD,” it reads “DRINK RHINEGOLD.”  I have contacted TWJ about this, to confirm.

Beyond the fact that it is a hard to find piece, it is that much more interesting as Voigt didn’t produce Rhinegold.  They produced Rheingold…

rh

glass

After a bit of digging, I found the following in the Detroit Free Press from 1905…

Edward W. Voigt

voigtportrait

President and Treasurer Voigt Brewing Co.

The brewing business today is among our greatest and most important in industries, and its is a natural consequence that some of our brainiest and ablest men are identified with it.  Mr. E. W. Voigt, head of the Voigt Brewery Company, is notable example of these enterprising men.

Mr. Voigt has been in the brewing business in this city since 1866, having succeeded his father as manager of the firm that he is with at present.  His business success is probably due to his ability and constant desire to utilize modern methods and appliance in his business.  It is a well-known fact that he has originated a number of ideas which have materially assisted the progress of the brewers’ art.

Mr. Voigt is well and favorably known in German social circles and has achieved he confidence and respect from his business associates.  The Free Press takes pleasure in presenting a portrait of him in this issue.

The Voigt Brewing Davis/Detroit will be added to the website in the coming days.   Of course, I don’t have the other Voigt advertising corkscrews, and would happily trade for those as well.    Do you have one?

And, while I am at it, while there is no relation to Voigt, there is a  “LOCK CITY BREWING CO.” Davis out there somewhere, that I am also hunting for.

UPDATE:  This just in from Tipped Worm Johnny!  It IS different than the previously found example.  A new discovery!  Thanks for the info TWJ!

So, what happened at Brimfield?

I know it has been a few days since I blogged, so perhaps I should catch up.  Yes, we went to Brimfield!

Of course, I might as well fill you in on all the other minutiae…

On Saturday, the lovely personal personal trainer, headed off island, while I stayed and completed further finishing touches on the wine shop.  And, as the appropriate hour, I hopped on the boat, and headed over myself.  The afternoon, and the following day, was spent mudding and painting our mainland digs, and also a little further prep for the Brimfield adventure.

On Monday, I headed down early, to check into the house we rented for the week, and also to pick up Tommy from the airport.  Along the way, I passed countless antique stores that were all closed given the early hour.

A bit after my departure, the lovely, who painted her way out of the kitchen, headed back to the boat to pick up our friend Alison would also be joining us for the Brimfield trip.  They plan was to pick up some additional groceries (I already had the wine) and meet up at the rental house.

Tommy’s plane arrived as scheduled, and it wasn’t long before we were back at the house.  He had brought a few corkscrews for show, tell, and possibly trade.  And, I had done the same.  He is rather desirous of the Western Appliance wall mount, and Tommy had recently acquired a Gorham Sterling prongs, that I really wanted as well.  He also brought along a couple of unusual pieces that he recently picked up, one that looks to be a patent from the back of O’Leary.  I have long felt that it is a good idea, when the opportunity presents itself, to be able to handle and examine new discoveries.  What are the functions?  What does it look like in person?

A little wine was consumed, and at that point no trades had been completed.

A little later, a message came in from the lovely, that they were about 20 minutes away.  And, upon their arrival, we popped some Champagne, and toasted our third Brimfield adventure together (third with the four of us, I have been going for for a decade or so).

The evening was spent with convivial conversations, but still an early night, as we would be waking up early, for Brimfield Day One!

Brimfield Day One:

Day one started early.  By 4:30 in the morning,  Tommy and I were on the road to the show.   Sue and Alison would catch up with us later.  After parking the truck, we wished each other luck, and headed off in different directions.

There were many corkscrews to be had, but largely of the Williamson, Clough, and Walker variety.  And, of those, pretty much of the common Williamson, Clough, and Walker variety.

Over the course of the morning, Tommy and I would cross paths, and eventually ran into Barry.  For the most part, the conversation went something like,

“Anything yet.”

“Not really.”

And, we would then part ways again.

In the final field of the day, however, there were a few better corkscrews available.  Tommy picked up a Murphy button, and Barry unearthed the find of the day; an Aaron Austin Toilet Necessity in really nice condition.  As it is a double for Barry, Tommy was hot for it.  I have no doubt a deal will be made between the two of them at some point.

I had a few nice little finds over the course of the day.  Early in the morning, I happened upon a simple t-pull with brewery advertising; Rochester Brewing…  At the hefty price of 8 dollars, I figured it was a good thing.  Later the morning, I happened on the identical corkscrew with different advertising.  This time for Genesee Brewing.  It was a bit more than the Rochester, but it makes for a good pair.

There were a couple of perfumes, which will go into the lovely’s collection, a couple of mechanicals, a Nylin patent, an interesting figural fish marked DENMARK, and a really nice Anri Bacchus stopper–missing the cork.  The cork will be replaced and will remain in the collection, although there is little reason for a wine stopper in our house…

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Not a bad day one.  Of course, there were lots of other things for sale!

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In between, the lovely and Alison arrived, and we met up for a picnic lunch; tail gating on the truck.  Following lunch, they girls headed off on their own adventure, and we would get messages when they ran across a corkscrew.

With all of the fields of the day having been visited, we called it a day.  According to our various devices, it showed that Tommy and I had traversed 14.6 and 13.5 miles over the course of the morning/afternoon respectively.

As has become tradition, the evening was spent with wine and stories of the day, and a Taco Tuesday dinner.

It was, again, an early evening as Wednesday would be an early start.

Brimfield Day Two:

On day two, I headed down to the kitchen and proceeded to consume several cups of coffee.  Tommy soon came downstairs, and we were once again headed to the show.  The first field opens at 6 am, and we rolled into the parking lot at 5:54.  Hightailing it to the gate, we were walking in with the awaiting crowds, just as the field opened.

In the first aisle, I found an interesting Anri Monkey nutcracker, but the price was pretty high.  I still toyed with picking it up.  In the end, I left it behind, but let a friend who collects Anri know where it was.  I did pick up a couple of things in the field; a flash was the first purchase of the day, this was followed by an Atlas Beer opener/pencil, and this was followed by a Murphy patent bell with the spike.  I have lots and lots of Murphys, and this indeed is a double (or quadruple, if you want to get technical).  Still, it is a good thing, at a very fair price.

After a bit more hunting, I ran into Tommy a booth where a particular dealer always has corkscrews.  There was a really handsome Henshall with an interesting button and bone handle.  I got to witness Tommy’s negotiating skills in action.  Still, the dealer was a little less inclined to drop much in price, so we walked away.

We meandered a bit through other fields for the next hour, and in anticipation of the 9:00 field opening, headed over and grabbed a seat.  A few minutes later, Barry joined us, and we discussed how the show was going so far and also gave us a chance to catch up on recent finds.

As the field opened, the lovely messaged to say that she and Alison had arrived, and would head over to the field.  I had picked up a few things in my wandering; a few more perfumes, a Sterling roundlet (in not great shape), and few other interesting bits.

The 9:00 field, was eventually followed by the 12:00 field.  Not much there, and Barry and I crossed paths multiple times.  We actually found ourselves in one booth at the very same time, reaching for the very same corkscrew.  But, 35 dollars for a Hercules seemed a little steep to both of us, and similarly both of us opted to leave it behind.

There were, however, other things to buy at the various fields…

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After exhausting the various fields, Sue and Alison decided to head off to Litchfield for a bit of an adventure, and TC and I decided to head off further afield, and do a little antiquing before meeting back at the house for the nightly show and tell and wine.  This was followed by grilling a few filets, and a trade.  Yes, a trade!

Between TC and I, it was quite the pile of corkscrew and openers accumulated thus far…

IMG_5881

Brimfield Day Three:

Day three started, a little less early, and I drove Tommy back to the airport–amongst other corkscrews, the aforementioned Henshall was in his suitcase, as he went back to the dealer and attempted negotiating the price again.  The dealer stood firm, and Tommy sprung for it.  It is a pretty cool corkscrew, after all.

After dropping TC off, and heading back to the house to help check out, I returned to Brimfield for Mays; which opens at 9 on Thursday.  Walking the line, I didn’t see Barry.  I wondered if he had decided to skip, and start the drive to New York and then back home to Florida.

I wandered the aisles, and at the fourth tent, picked up a nice Murphy with acorn handles; one of the earlier ones.  Two aisles over, I picked up a Bridgewater patent coffin guy.  The price was fair, and I had traded my last one to Leon on his visit to the island.  It was nice to find a suitable replacement.

Not much in the way of exciting corkscrews, but a few pieces.  And, I managed to find another perfume for the lovely.

After one more traversing of the fields, I headed off to say goodbye to a few dealer friends, and hit the road for Rockland, and the following day, hopped the boat back to the island.

For those wondering, there were a few other things to buy in Brimfield on day three…

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All in all, a pretty good Brimfield adventure.

“…clever advertising novelty (patented).”

From the January 10th 1915 edition of  the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jan10spielbauer

FOR sale outright, clever advertising novelty (patented), with dies complete; sells quickly; big profits; owner too far west to manufacturers: snap: sample free.  Josephine Spielbauer.  71 Columbia st., Seattle, Wash.

In doing research into the Josephine Spielbauer patent not much information or history has been uncovered.  I have since been in contact with a Spielbauer family member, and we are exchanging information.  A most recent email set about yet another search, and the above classified ad came up.

spielbauer

So, Miss Josephine was selling her patent and dies as well to create the corkscrew/opener.  Could it be the “samples” that she sent out, are the few pieces that exist within our respective collections?

Interesting also to note.  The Spielbauer patent was awarded in November of 1914, by 1916 the state of Washington implemented prohibition (earlier than the rest of the country).

No more beer?  Would production of corkscrews and openers cease as well?

 

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

From an 1889 issue of The Iron Age

Empire Automatic Cork Extractor

This article, patented April 16, 1889, is manufactured by the Empire Knife Company, West Winsted, Conn.  Its form and

empireautomaticcorkextractor

general construction are show in the accompanying illustration.  A spring in the head detaches the handle from the corkscrew rod, so that the corkscrew does not turn in the cork while pulling out, and the corkscrew can be set to turn any distance into the cork, so that the cork need not be pierced through, thus saving it for use again.  The power of this corkscrew is referered to as such that the hardest corks can be pulled with ease.

Of course, the Empire Automatic Cork Extractor is the Seymour L. Alvord and Edward E. Brown patent of 1889 (number 401,672).  Not often turning up with a patent mark, when they do, they are marked “PAT. APR 16 ‘89.”

This one still eludes me, if you have an Alvord and Brown patent with which you would like to part, I have plenty of tradebait available!

Send your order today, pin a dollar bill to coupon below and the shipment will go forward to you the same day as received.

From an issue of Air Wonder Stories, November 1929

Ten Tools in One

A SMALL but handy article which serves every possible need of the all-round mechanic.  In valuable in any emergency.  An excellent combination of all utilities for the household featured:  HAMMER—KNIFE-SHARPENER—NAIL-PULLER—BOTTLE-OPENER—SCREW-DRIVER—CORK-SCREW—CAN-OPENER—WEIGH-SCALE—RULER—TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Just glance at the illustration and you will see how really useful this article is.  The “Ten in One Tool” is 10 inches high and finely nickel-pated.

aldersonpatentillustration

The new tool is not only handy in the household, but every TOURIST, AUTOIST, CAMPER, PICNICKER, BOYSCOUT, FISHERMAN, CANOEIST, etc., should carry in his bag one of these indispensable combination tools.  No SHOP, OFFICE, STORE, GARAGE, FARM, BOAT, should be without one.  Price $1.00 POSTAGE PAID.

Be the first one to own the “Ten in One” in your town.

Send your order today, pin a dollar bill to coupon below and the shipment will go forward to you the same day as received.

GRENPARK TOOL CO.

245 Greenwich St.

New York

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – –

Greenpark Tool Company

245 Greenwich Street,
New York, N.Y.

Enclosed find a $1.00 for which please send me prepaid your “Ten Tools in One

Name

Address

Town                                       State…..

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – –

Now, we know the “Ten in One Tool” as the Frederich J. Alderson patent of 1932.

Alderson (having already obtained a Canadian patent) was awarded his American patent for a Combination Tool (# 1,845,038) on February 16th.  85 years ago tomorrow!

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a leg up…

Sometime around Christmas, I ran across an online advertisement for a Detroit leg corkscrew.  And, the person was asking $122.00.  That of course seemed fair enough given the photo.   I responded in short order, asking about other pictures and the like.

In response, the person said, that they would like a bit less than their original asking price, and explained that they decided on 122, as they needed to put something out there, and given the corkscrew was patented in 1894, at it being–when the ad was placed–2016, the 122 year old corkscrew was given a 122 dollar price tag.

After then exchanging phone numbers, I accepted their reduced price, and promptly sent monies.

After payment was made, and accepted.  It was the last thing I heard from the seller.

They promised to send pictures and tracking, and…

And, then nothing.

Being a (somewhat) patient person, I just waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

And, I waited.

No emails, no phone calls, no tracking numbers…and, more importantly, no Detroit leg.

After a couple of weeks, I sent an email, which garnered no response.  And, I picked up the phone a couple of times, only to reach voicemail, and no return phone call.

I waited a bit longer.

Last week, closing in on a month later, I sent another email.  This one was a little more…shall we say, blunt and to the point.

The next morning, I received an email with apologies and explanations, and a promise that the leg would be mailed of that day…and, this was followed up by an email with tracking information.

Yesterday, the leg indeed arrived.  And, my faith in humanity restored.  This leg is the plain variety, and there is some areas of finish loss, but it is nicely marked, and has a nice snap to the corkscrew.

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Thanks for the deal unnamed-detroit-plain-leg-corkscrew-sellers, and I hope that everything improves for you both.

This leg would be a double/duplicate for me, so feel free to offer up any trades you might have!  If you would like information on the Detroit Cork Screw Company, check out my Detroit Cork Screws page

If you are only going to buy one thing at the local flea…

It was a fabulous week.  The lovely personal personal trainer and I were in Florida for the past seven days, and arrived back home yesterday.

We visited with John and Martha for the first few days, enjoying their hospitality, the beach, the boat, a bit of fishing, and some fantastic food and wine.

From Marathon, we headed north to Palm Beach where we spent a night on our own, before heading towards Orlando and ultimately The Villages with a wonderful visit at Barry and Marty’s new digs.  We also visited the Morse Museum in Winter Park, which houses the largest collection of Tiffany stained glass and other Tiffany creations.  It was mind blowing.

Of course, there are a few corkscrews at Barry and Marty’s place, and I got to see some of the new additions that have been added since the last time we saw the collection.

Laughs, wine, food, corkscrews…it was a great time, and in between, Barry, the lovely, and I headed to a (relatively) local flea market that given MLK holiday was going to be bigger than usual.

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After our arrival, the lovely and I headed one direction, whilst Barry headed another, and we agreed to meet up at an appointed time.  There were a few things about, not a bunch of corkscrews, but a few.  And, largely they were the common variety–but fairly priced.

With still an hour before we were to meet up, I looked under a table where I found a small tin of buttonhooks.  At 6 dollars a piece, I was hopeful that there might be a folding bow with corkscrew with buttonhook.  Asking the dealer if I could dump out the tin to examine them closely, I flipped over the tin and rifled through.

No corkscrews and buttonhooks were present, however…

I know, the suspense is killing you.

There was indeed something worth buying within that tin–well what was previously within the tin and now was spread out over a small blanket.

And, it wasn’t a buttonhook.  But, it could easily be mistaken for one.

I do already own one of these, but to find one in the wild is rather exciting…

(Would you get to the point already?  What was it?)

While the lovely picked up a nice mechanical Anri stopper, what was amongst the buttonhooks was the only thing I purchased that day.  But, if you are only going to find one thing at the local flea, it is a nice thing to find.

Speaking of, while we were walking up to meet Barry, also at the flea was corkscrew collector (and carved alligator collector) Tom Staley.  It was nice to catch up, and perhaps we will finally make the trade we have been negotiating for 6 years.

He said he will bring the corkscrew I am after when he visits Brimfield (and then Maine) in May, and I will bring the corkscrew he is after.  We shall see if they finally change hands.

What was the purchase at the flea in Florida?

A folding Greeley patent, clearly marked with the patent date.  A great find, especially given the asking price!

foldingreeleyflorida.jpg

greeleydate

Given the Greeley is a double/duplicate…I am guessing the trade or outright purchase offers will be pouring in shortly!

A great week away, and now we are back home in Maine.  A bit of snow on the ground, and it is back to corkscrewing around!

And, a few more poison indicators…

Not that I have actually discovered any poison indicator corkscrews since we last spoke–not that I am speaking–but, I thought I would thumb through the back of O’Leary and check out the patent drawings (once again).

As mentioned the other day, the first mention in O’Leary of a corkscrew with a poison purpose, is the Bailey Safety Alarm of 1890.

baileyspatent

That said, I found another reference on pharmacy history that has an illustration of the both the 1883 Stites Bottle Stopper and the 1890 Bailey Safety Alarm with the words “Stites Cross Bones Stopper and Corkscrew.” In visiting the patent, no corkscrew is mentioned in the Stites patent description, but it would certainly be cool if it actually had one–or if we could find one for that matter.

skullcork

The Blake patent of 1914, mentioned the other day is the next poison related corkscrew illustrated in O’Leary.

patentpoisondisk

In looking at the dates, and while no patent has been found, we then go into 1915 with the Hall’s Red Devil Skull.  And, the newly identified as a patent, so not pictured in O’Leary, Hudson patent of 1915.

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In 1916, we see T.E. Higgins “Poison Alarm Device.”  Again, a piece that I have never seen in person, or pictured, and one that certainly should do its job, with a large skull hanging above a corkscrew inserted in a bottle.

higginspatent

In 1917, there is the Ketler patent for a “poison bottle indicator.”  Similarly themed, it has a skull and crossbones in a circular frame.  Again, as far as I know, this has yet to be discovered within our respective collections.

ketler

In 1921, we are introduced to the Teece patent “poison bottle top.”

teece

And, finally in 1924, there is another Skull and Crossbones styles corkscrew: the Fleisher patent, with folding corkscrew attached to the top of the skull, and a spike to insert into the cork:

fleisher

There are lots of other poison indicators without corkscrews.  Many patents, with largely the same theme, spikes and sharp edges.  Like the Hall’s Red Skull, where the horns are intended to serve as a warning in the middle of the night, and the sharp edges of the Blake (which we haven’t found) or the serrated disk, which is similar to, and could very well be the Bailey’s Safety Alarm, there are sharp edges, spikes, prongs, barbs, and the like which are intended to serve as a deterrent.

This is going to hurt you, so don’t drink this.

As far as I know, most of these patents haven’t been found in a real life form.  Do you have one of these poison related corkscrews?  Do you have a different poison related corkscrew?

Feel free to drop me a line.

Dead Ringer…

As mentioned on the Edward Leverich Hall post, there was mention that Hall (or his company) possessed the patent rights.  So…I started to look for a patent.  In doing so, I found several references to patents for poison indicators or poison warning devices, but one poison indicator, in particular, I was excited to find.  After a little more research, I ran into an article in a 1915 issue of Pharmaceutical Era

POISON INDICATOR

Many mechanical inventions have been devised for apprising individuals of the poisonous contents of bottles that they may be called upon to handle.  One of the most recent devices of this character is the invention of Mahalah T. Hudson, Kirksville, Mo. (Patent No. 1,131,839), shown in the pharmadrawaccompanying illustration.  It comprises a frame formed from a blank and provided with a central body, upon which are formed integral arms bent upward as to me at their end portions; a bell carried by the ends of said arms, integral plates formed upon said body and extending at right upper angles thereto, said plates being adapted to rest upon the upper portions of a cork of a bottle for retaining the frame in its correct vertical position, and spurs extending downwardly from the lower portion of the body for digging into the cork whereby the poison indicator will be held in engagement and rest evenly on the upper portion of the cork.

And, might be saying to yourself, “Okay, not so fast Josef, there isn’t a screw, there are two spurs…”

Yes, you would have a point there…  But, if you look at the other illustration from the patent drawing, that wasn’t shown in the Pharmaceutical Era blurb, there IS a corkscrew.

hudsonbell

That little bell that you have in your collection, is indeed a patent.  And, a dead ringer for the patent drawing!

bellpoison

A patent for a poison indicator.  And, one that does not appear in the front or the back of O’Leary.

The 1915 Hudson patent #1,131,839…